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Full text of "Lee University Catalog"

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1955 

leveland, Tennessee 



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MAY, 1952 



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LEE COLLEGE LI9RABT 
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LE <^ J is 

awarded after the completion of three years of satis- 
factory work. 

It is the purpose of the following pages to present 
concisely essential information concerning LEE COL- 
LEGE. This issue contains the register of the thirty- 
third year and the announcements of the thirty-fourth 
year. 



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ANNUAL CATALOGUE 
ISSUE 

MAY, 19 5 2 

Announcement for the Thirty-Fourth Year 
19 5 2-1953 

Register for the Thirty -Third Year 
19 5 1-19 5 2 



The College reserves the right to make 
neeessary changes without further notice. 



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Cleveland, Tennessee 



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52461 









JANUARY 



2^ 



5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 31 



APRIL 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 

JULY 



s 


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T 
1 


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22 23 24 25 26 



1952 





FEBRUARY 




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11 12 13 14 15 


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S M 



MARCH 

T W T F 



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30 31 



MAY 

S M T W T F S 

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JUNE 

S M T W T F S 

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22 23 24 25 26 27 28 

29 30 



S M 



AUGUST 

T W T 



F 
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10 11 12 13 14 15 



SEPTEMBER 

SSMTWTFS 
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9! 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 

16 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 



27 28 29 30 31 



17 18 19 20 21 22 23 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 







OCTOBER 








NOVEMBER 








DECEMBER 




s 


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JANUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 

25 26 27 28 29 30 31 



1953 



FEBRUARY 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 



MARCH 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 6 7 

8 9 10 11 12 13 14 

15 16 17 18 19 20 21 



22 23 24 25 26 27 28 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 
29 30 31 



APRIL 

S M T W T F S 

12 3 4 

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 

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S M 



JULY 

T W T 
1 2 



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MAY 

S M T W T F S 

1 2 

3 4 5 6 7 8 9 

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 

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31 



AUGUST 

S M T W T F S 

1 

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SEPTEMBER 

5 M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

6 7 8 9 10 11 12 
13 14 15 16 17 18 19 
20 21 22 23 24 25 26 
27 28 29 30 



OCTOBER 

M T W T F 

1 2 

5 6 7 8 9 



11 12 13 14 15 16 17 



NOVEMBER 

M T W T F 
2 3 4 5 6 
9 10 11 12 13 



15 16 17 18 19 20 21 



DECEMBER 

M T W T F S 

12 3 4 5 

7 8 9 10 11 12 

13 14 15 16 17 18 19 



18 19 20 21 22 23 24 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 



25 26 27 28 29 30 21 29 30 



27 28 29 30 31 



CONTENTS 



Academy 84-89 

Accreditation 84 

Admission 84 

Amount of work 85 

Courses of Instruction 

Art 86 

Commercial 86 

English 87 

Home Economics 87 

Manual Art 87 

Mathematics 87 

Music 88 

Physical Education 88 

Science 88 

Social Studies 88 

Spanish 89 

Speech 89 

Board of Directors 17 

Co-operating State Overseers 1 8 

Faculty 20 

General Information 23^15 

Absences 41 

Adjustment of Accounts __ 44 

Admission to Lee College _. 38 

Aim and Purpose 23 

Chapel 29 

Discipline 36 

Dormitory Suggestions 35 

Dropping Courses 40 

Grounds and Buildings .__. 27 

Historical Sketch 24 

Individual Lessons in Music 42 

Information for Veterans __ 37 

Itemized Expenses 41 

Living Regulations 34 

Location and Transporta- 
tion 23 

Musical Activities 29 

Orientation 40 

Recreation 34 

Rental Fees 43 

Room Reservation 39 

School Apartments 39 

Settlement of Accounts .... 43 



Social Life 33 

Special Students 44 

Student Aid 35 

Student Organizations — 30 

Student Publications 33 

Student Thrift-Training ____ 36 

Visitors 31 

Week-End Trips 33 

Withdrawal 40 

Graduates, 1952 91 

Home Study Department 90 

Junior College 46-73 

Admission Requirements 47-49 
Description of Courses 
Business Administra- 
tion 58-60 

Christian Education __60-61 

Economics 60 

Education 60 

English 61-62 

Everyday Art 57 

Geography 62 

History 63 

Home Economics 63-64 

Languages 64-65 

Mathematics 65-66 

Music 66-68 

Orientation 68 

Psychology 68-69 

Religion 69-7 1 

Sciences 7 1 -72 

Sociology 72 

Speech 72-73 

General Regulations 51-52 

Guidance Program 50 

Maximum and Minimum 49 

Music 57 

Registration 51 

Requirements for Gradua- 
tion 52-57 

Associate in Arts De- 
gree 52 

Liberal Arts 53 

Religion 55-57 



CONTENTS 



Scholastic System 50 

Lee College Is Inside Front 

Cover 
Officers of Administration ___- 17 

Religious Education 74-83 

Admission Requirements 74 

Application 74 

Departmental Division 75 

Description of Courses 

First Year 80-81 

Second Year 81-83 

Third Year 83 



High School Curricula 75 

Grading System 75 

Ministerial Course 77-78 

Missions Course 75-77 

Purpose 74 

Registration 75 

Schedule of Courses 

Ministerial 79 

Missions 78 

Request for Application 93 

School Calendars 15-16 

Staff 22 



THE SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 1952-1953 TERM 



First Semester 



September 8, 1952 . 
September 8, 1952 . 
September 10, 1952 . 
September 10, 1952 . 
September 11, 1952 . 

September 22, 1952 . 



September 29, 1952 . 



October 3, 1952 . . 
October 30, 31, 1952 . 
November 17-21, 1952 
November 27, 1952 . 
December 19, 1952 . 
January 5, 1953 . . 



January 21-24, 1953 . 



Registration of new students. 

G.E.D. Tests for veterans. . 

Registration of old students. 

Student-Faculty reception. 

Classes begin (or orientation 
and formal opening). 

Last day on which a student 
will be allowed to register for 
first semester. LAST DAY ON 
WHICH A STUDENT MAY 
DROP A PRIVATE LESSON 
AND RECEIVE A REFUND. 

Last day on which a student 
may enter a course for credit 
or drop a course without re- 
ceiving a failing grade. 

Fall picnic. 

E.T.E.A. meeting. 

Fall Convocation. 

Thanksgiving Day. 

Christmas holidays begin. 

Christmas holidays end, re- 
sume classes. 



Final examinations 
semester. 



for first 



THE SCHOOL CALENDAR FOR 1952-1953 TERM 

Second Semester 

January 26, 27, 1953 .... Registration. G.E.D. Tests for 

veterans. 

January 28, 1953 Classes begin. 

February 9, 1953 Last day on which a student 

will be allowed to register for 
second semester. LAST DAY 
ON WHICH A STUDENT MAY 
DROP A PRIVATE LESSON 
AND RECEIVE A REFUND. 

February 16, 1953 .... Last day on which a student 

may enter a course for credit 
or drop a course without re- 
ceiving a failing grade. 

March 23-27, 1953 .... Spring Spiritual Emphasis 

Week. 

April 3-6, 1953 Easter holidays. 

ARril 18, 1953 Senior banquet. 

May 8, 1953 Spring picnic. 

May 24, 1953 Baccalaureate service. 

May 23-27, 1953 Final Examinations. 

May 28, 29, 1953 Commencement exercises. 



BOARD OF DIRECTORS 

H. D. WILLIAMS, Chairman — Church of God Campground, 
Bessemer Super Highway, Birmingham, Alabama 

L. H. AULTMAN— 803 N. Main Street, Box 221, Weatherford, 
Texas 

J. L. BYRD— 102 Grove Road, Box 1857, Greenville, South 
Carolina 

JAMES A. CROSS — Edgewood Grove, Somerset, Pennsylvania 

C. J. HINDMON— Box 418, Chandler, Oklahoma 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

JOHN C. JERNIGAN President 

LEONARD CARROLL President-Elect 

EARL M. TAPLEY, A.B., M.A., (Completed classwork and 
officially voted to candidacy for Ph.D., University of 
Chicago), Vice-President and Dean of Academic Admin- 
istration 

RUFUS L. PLATT, B.A., M.A., Assistant to the Vice-President 

LACY D. POWELL, B.A., M.A., Registrar and Dean of Stu- 
dents 

J. DUEL FREE .... Business Manager and Treasurer 

JOSEPHINE DAVIS, B.S., M.A Librarian 



CO-OPERATING STATE OVERSEERS 

ALABAMA — H. D. Williams, Church of God Campground, 
Bessemer Super Highway, Birmingham, Alabama 

ARIZONA— Y. W. Kidd, 322 N. Patricio Street, Phoenix, 
Arizona 

ARKANSAS— L. L. Hughes, 213 S. Valmar Avenue, Little 
Rock, Arkansas 

CALIFORNIA-NEVADA— H. B. Ramsey, 3961 Oakdale, Pasa- 
dena 10, California 

COLORADO-UTAH— W. J. Cothern, P. O. Box 66, Clifton, 
Colorado 

DELAWARE-D. C. -MARYLAND— G. W. Lane, 2403 Elsinor 
Avenue, Baltimore 16, Maryland 

FLORIDA— J. T. Roberts, 5602 Nebraska Avenue, Tampa 4, 
Florida 

GEORGIA— E. L. Simmons, P. O. Box 428, Doraville, Georgia 

IDAHO-OREGON-WASHINGTON— F. W. Goff, 616 S. 10th 
Avenue, Yakima, Washington 

ILLINOIS — Floyd Timmerman, 5 N. Highland Place, Mt. Ver- 
non, Illinois 

INDIANA— C. R. Spain, Route 3, Box 985-E, Indianapolis, 
Indiana 

IOWA— Carl Cox, 1194 W. 14th Street, Des Moines, Iowa 

KANSAS— W. E. Dowdy, 509 Charlotte Street, Independence, 

KENTUCKY— R. R. Walker, 141 Burnette Avenue, Box 448, 

Lexington, Kentucky 
LOUISIANA— T. M. McClendon, Box 3035, Istrouma Branch, 

Baton Rouge 5, Louisiana 
MICHIGAN— M. P. Cross, 751 Hendrie Boulevard, Royal Oak, 

Michigan 
MINNESTOA— Alfred Nicholson, 2624 Oakland Avenue S., 

Minneapolis 7, Minnesota 
MISSISSIPPI— G. C. Hamby, 1804 Piedmont Street, Box 925, 

Jackson, Mississippi 
MISSOURI— Glyndon Logsdon, 215 Crane Street, Flat River, 

Missouri 
MONTANA-WYOMING— Doyle Stanfield, Box 747, Harlow- 

ton, Montana 
NEBRASKA— W. R. Collins, 1102 East 3rd Street, Fairbury, 

NEW ENGLAND-NOVA SCOTIA— D. G. Homner, 14 Powsland 

Street, Portland, Maine 
NEW JERSEY— Walter R. Pettit, Box 306, Pleasantville, New 

Jersey 
NEW MEXICO— J. L. Summers, Box 1206, Roswell, New 

Mexico 
NEW YORK— Madison W. Sindle, 146-53 Brookville Boule- 
vard, Rosedale 10, Long Island, New York 
NORTH CAROLINA- Earl P. Paulk, 1501 Parkwood Avenue, 

Box 1727, Charlotte, North Carolina 
NORTH DAKOTA-SOUTH DAKOTA— T. L. Forrester, 123 

7th Avenue N.E., Minot, North Dakota 
OHIO— Paul H. Walker, 930 Champion Avenue, Columbus 6, 

Ohio 



OKLAHOMA— C. J. Hindmcn, Box 418, Chandler, Oklahoma 

PENNSYLVANIA— James A. Cross, Edge wood Grove, Somer- 
set, Pennsylvania 

SOUTH ALABAMA— H. T. Statum, Box 301, Greenville, Ala- 
bama 

SOUTH CAROLINA— John L. Byrd, 102 Grove Road, Box 
1857, Greenville, South Carolina 

TENNESSEE— A. V. Beaube, 835 Trunk Street, N.E., Cleve- 
l3,nd TcnnGSSGP 

TEXAS— L. H. Aultman, 803 N. Main Street, Box 221, Weath- 
prford Tpxsls 

VIRGINIA— T. W. Godwin, 2626 Broad Street, Box 5056, 
Roanoke 12, Virginia 

WEST VIRGINIA— J. H. Hughes, 414 N. Kanawha Street, 
Box 522, Beckley, West Virginia 

WISCONSIN— Estel D. Moore, 1219 Jefferson Street, Box 761, 
Wausau, Wisconsin 

CENTRAL CANADA— Darrell L. Lindsay, 413 Horton Street, 
London, Ontario, Canada 

WESTERN CANADA— James A. Stephens, Box 332, Estevan, 
Saskatchewan, Canada 



FACULTY 

REUBEN T. ALLEN, A.B., Mathematics 

A.B., University of Tennessee, Graduate Work, University 

of Tennessee. 
LOIS UNDERWOOD BEACH, B.S., M.S., Home Economics, 

Science, Art 

B.S., University of Tennessee; Flat River Junior College; 

Campbell College; M.S., University of Tennessee; Iowa 

State College. 
BEATRICE SIRMONS BETROS, B.S., Business Education 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women; Graduate work, 

Florida State University. 
BEATRICE V. COLEY, B.S., English, Physical Education 
B.S., University of Tennessee; Lee College; Bob Jones Col- 
lege; Graduate work, University of Tennessee. 
CHARLES W. CONN, Doctrines, Theology 

•Lee College. 
NINA EDGE DRIGGERS, A.B., English 

A.B., Asbury College; Graduate work, University of Ten- 
nessee. 
MYRTLE CRANK FLEMING, B.S., Science, English 

B.S., East Tennessee State College; Lee College. 
RUFUS H. GAUSE, A.B., B.D., Bible 

A.B., Presbyterian College; B.D., Columbia Theological 

Seminary; Emmanuel College. 
E. EUGENE HORTON, B.A. in Ed., Physical Education, Social 

Science 

B.A., Wayne State Teachers College, Wayne, Nebraska; 

Lee College; Guilford College; Graduate work, University 

of South Dakota. 
ROBERT D. HUMBERTSON, A.B., Speech 

A.B., University of Maryland; Lee College; Graduate 

work, Ohio State University. 
RUBY MYRTLE HURST, Piano 

American College of Music; Lee College. 
EDITH NELSON MOONEY, B.S., M.A., History, Education 

B.S., University of Alabama; M.A., University of Ala- 
bama. 
BEATRICE HAMILTON ODOM, B.A., Christian Education, 

Bible 

B.A., Bob Jones University. 
ELMER FRANKLIN ODOM, B.A., Bible 

B.A., Bob Jones University; University of Chattanooga; 

Graduate work, George Peabody College for Teachers; 

University of Tennessee. 
RUFUS L. PLATT, B.A., M.A., Social Science, Industrial Arts 

B.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; Lee College; 

M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 
LACY D. POWELL, B.A., M.A., Psychology 

B.A., Maryville College; University of Tennessee; Lee 

College; University of Arkansas; M.A., George Peabody 



College for Teachers; Additional graduate work, Lou- 
isiana State University. 

HENRY C. RICKS, B.A., M.A., Social Science, Spanish 

B.A., George Peabody College for Teachers; Lee College; 
M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

DORCAS R. SHARP, B.A., English, Spanish 

B.A., Southeastern Louisiana College; Lee College. 

META HARRIS SHERMAN, B.M., M.M., Music 

Graduate, Cadek Conservatory of Music; B.M., Cincin- 
nati Conservatory of Music; Juilliard School of Music; 
University of Tennessee; University of Chattanooga; 
M.M., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music; American Con- 
servatory of Music; Chicago Musical College; Student 
under Roy Lamont Smith, Severin Eisenberger, Muriel 
Kerr, George Ackley Brower, Carl Hugo Grimm. 

FRANKLIN I. SMITH, B.S., Business Education, Dean of Men 
B.S., University of Alabama; Lee College; Graduate 
work, University of Georgia. 

AVIS SWIGER, Missions, Religion, English 
Salem College. 

HELEN IRENE SYMES, Accordion 

Lee College; Tennessee Polytechnic Institute. 

EARL M. TAPLEY, B.A., M.A., Orientation 

B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A., George Peabody Col- 
lege for Teachers; Completed classwork and officially 
admitted to candidacy for Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

RUBY JEWELL TAPLEY, Piano, English 

Scarritt College; George Peabody College for Teachers; 
Lee College; University of Chattanooga; Tennessee Poly- 
technic Institute. 

WILLIAM H. YATES, B.M., Music 

B.M., University of Tennessee; Mary ville College; Whea- 
ton College; Graduate work, George Peabody College 
for Teachers. 

BEATRICE DODSON YATES, B.S., M.S., Home Economics, 
Sociology 

B.S., University of Tennessee; Bob Jones College; M.S., 
University of Tennessee. 



STAFF 
Alphabetical Order 

IVAN ADAMS Fireman 

ELIZABETH BURTON Cook 

CLARENCE CARROLL Policeman 

ESTHER CLARK Assistant to the Treasurer 

ETHEL DOUGLAS Cashier 

GEORGE DOUGLAS, Manager of Bookstore and Snack Shop 

CLARONE HUGHES Secretary to the Treasurer 

GRADY HURST Cook 

BETTY JORDAN Assistant to the Treasurer 

CLEONE McLAIN Assistant to the Librarian 

JAMES MOSLEY Maintenance 

ELEANOR OUZTS .... Secretary to the Vice-President 

JOHN PIGG Manager of the Cafeteria 

MARGARETA POULOS Dean of Women 

LEWIS SLAUGHTER Maintenance 

LUCILLE VANCE Assistant to the Registrar 

ADINA VAUGHT Secretary to the Registrar 

JEWEL WOOD . . . ( Alumni Secretary 



General Information 



LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION 

Lee College is located in Cleveland, Tennessee, the 
county seat of Bradley County, with approximately 
fourteen thousand inhabitants, and a distinctly south- 
ern tenor. It is located thirty miles northeast of Chat- 
tanooga on the Lee Highway, which is Highway 11. On 
this highway, which traverses Ocoee Street, and in one 
of the most beautiful residential sections of the city lies 
the college campus. 

The Greyhound, Tennessee Coach, and Trailway Bus 
Lines and the Southern Railway have stations in Cleve- 
land. As these maintain passenger as well as baggage 
service, trunks and baggage should be checked through 
to Cleveland. 



AIM AND PURPOSE 

It is the aim of Lee College to combine the forces of 
education and religion in promoting the Church and 
the kingdom of God in the earth. The institution's pur- 
pose is to develop the highest in Christian character 
and to cultivate a love for the richer, finer things of 
life. It seeks to develop in its students a knowledge of 
and love for the Bible, literature, and the arts and 
sciences, that this knowledge may be used for the prog- 
ress of man and the promotion of God's kingdom. 

"Lee College believes in putting first things first." 
It was originally founded as a Bible school for the ex- 
press purpose of promoting spiritual ideals and for the 
training of ministers and Christian workers. It believes 
that the world is ill from the effects of sin and that 
a means of recovery is to be found only through the 
preaching of the gospel of the Lord Jesus Christ and 
through a personal Christian work. This task is to be 
accomplished through God-called, consecrated men and 

23 



24 LEECOLLEGE 

women. It believes that these ministers and Christian 
workers should be thoroughly trained and educated for 
this great work of dealing with the souls of men, and 
to this aim the institution is dedicated. 

It is the aim of Lee College to help young men and 
young women to prepare for their chosen vocations in 
life. It aims to prepare its students for social and per- 
sonal adequacy and a sense of economic self-sufficiency 
and to give them intellectual and spiritual insight into 
the problems of human relations. It believes that men 
and women who are trained for their vocation or pro- 
fession may make a greater contribution to both God 
and society. To this aim Lee College is dedicated. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH 

Lee College was first established in 1918 and was 
known as Bible School and later as Bible Training 
School. When the junior college division was added in 
1941, it became Bible Training School and College. 
When the school moved to Cleveland in August of 1947, 
it was named Lee College in honor of the late Reverend 
F. J. Lee, who was superintendent in 1922 and later 
General Overseer of the Church of God. 

Lee College, with its present combination of Junior 
College, Religious Education (Ministerial and Mission- 
ary), and Academy, is the product of thirty-three years 
of growth and progress. It arose out of the zeal which 
the pioneers of the Church of God had at the General 
Assembly of 1917, when a recommendation for the 
establishment of a school for the training of Christian 
workers was adopted. The school was opened on Jan- 
uary 1, 1918, in a back room of the Church of God Pub- 
lishing House, in Cleveland, Tennessee. Six students 
were enrolled and Mrs. Nora B. Chambers was the 
teacher. 

The vast difference in this small beginning and the 
institution described in this catalogue can only be 
understood by those who have heard the story of the 
faithful efforts of its founders and early leaders. The 
names of Mrs. Chambers ; Rev. J. B. Ellis, the first 
superintendent; his successor, Rev. F. J. Lee, and Mrs. 
F. J. Lee, will always remain on the first pages of Lee 



GENERAL INFORMATION 25 

College history. For them the struggle was long and 
difficult; their sacrifices were innumerable, but some 
of them have lived to see the results of their labors. 

Appreciable gains were made each year and by the 
beginning of the fifth term, the enrollment had in- 
creased to such an extent that one room was no longer 
sufficient to house the school. A vacant church building 
on Twenty-fourth and Peoples Streets was converted 
into classrooms and dormitory. At this location the 
school continued to progress in spite of reverses. Rev. 
T. S. Payne was selected as superintendent in the year 
of 1924 and served the school for six years. Under his 
leadership, the curriculum was broadened and addi- 
tional faculty members were secured. As a result, the 
school again outgrew its facilities and was moved to 
the Church of God Auditorium, which had been built 
for the General Assembly. In 1930, Rev. J. H. Walker, 
who had taught in the school for three years, was 
elected superintendent. His administration marked the 
beginning of the Academy and the School of Business. 
When Rev. J. F. Walker became General Overseer of 
the Church in 1935, Rev. Zeno C. Tharp succeeded him 
as superintendent. 

Under Rev. Zeno C. Tharp's leadership, the progress 
of the school was remarkable. The auditorium had be- 
come entirely inadequate for the accommodation of the 
school, and in the summer of 1938, the Murphy Col- 
legiate Institute in Sevierville, Tennessee, was pur- 
chased. This plant furnished many new advantages in 
physical facilities, and the little town of Sevierville, 
located between Knoxville and the Smoky Mountains 
National Park, proved an ideal setting. Everyone 
thought the problem of space was solved for many 
years to come, but each year brought an increase in 
enrollment. By the end of the 1941-42 term, a new 
classroom building was an absolute necessity. Plans 
were formulated during the summer, and construction 
was begun at the beginning of the next term. By the 
time the building was ready for use, however, it was 
evident that the problem of housing students was be- 
coming serious. When over four hundred fifty students 
applied for admission at the beginning of the 1943 
term, the situation became acute. To meet the imme- 



26 LEECOLLEGE 

diate need, a large residence on Prince Street was pur- 
chased, the third floor of the Central Hotel was rented, 
and plans were drafted for a new dormitory for women. 

In 1944, J. H. Walker again assumed the responsi- 
bilities of president, and under his administration a 
number of improvements were made. 

Upon the resignation of Rev. J. H. Walker, Rev. E. L. 
Simmons was appointed president. Under his super- 
vision, the modern three-story girls' dormitory was 
completed and a trailer camp was added. 

In the first part of the year 1946, the Bob Jones Col- 
lege Plant in Cleveland, Tennessee, was offered for sale. 
The Council of Twelve was called to Cleveland and 
carefully went over the property. After considerable 
study and discussion, it was decided that the property 
should be bought for the Church, and for the sum of 
one and one-half million dollars ($1,500,000) the prop- 
erty was acquired. This property, with its housing 
facilities, will take care of more than one thousand 
students and amply provide living quarters for its 
faculty. 

The 1947-48 term of Lee College opened at its new 
location on September 1, 1947. This proved to be a 
very good year for Lee College. Lee instituted an 
Elementary Workshop in Education during the summer 
term of 1948. This workshop proved very successful 
and earned Lee the commendation of the State Depart- 
ment of Education. Fifty-two teachers attended this 
workshop and received six hours of college credit in 
Elementary Education. This training enabled many 
local teachers to renew their teaching certificates. Lee's 
perspective is broadening and her value to the com- 
munity is increasing. 

Rev. J. Stewart Brinsfield assumed the duties of the 
president of Lee College, September 1, 1948, and led 
the school through a very successful and satisfying 
year. The 1948-49 term was marked by a prevailing 
spirit of optimism and contentment among the student 
body and faculty of Lee. Many improvements were 
made in Lee to further her service to the students and 
community. One of the greatest of these was the in- 
stitution of night classes on the junior college and high 
school level, beginning October 15, 1948. The over-all 



GENERAL INFORMATION 27 

enrollment for the 1948-49 school year was 880, the 
largest in the history of Lee College. 

Reverend J. Stewart Brinsfield led Lee College 
through the 1949-50 school year in a very successful 
and gratifying manner. Many improvements were made 
and the over-all enrollment was 955, an increase of 75 
over the 1948-49 record-breaking enrollment. Lee ex- 
panded its offerings in order to better serve. During 
the summer of 1949, Dr. Clarence H. Benson conducted 
a series of three-week classes in the field of Sunday 
School preparation. These courses proved to be of in- 
estimable value to those pursuing them. Lee College 
moves outward and upward. The most outstanding fea- 
ture of the year was the February revival, probably 
the greatest in the history of the school. 

GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The campus is located in one of the most beautiful 
residential sections of Cleveland. Most of the buildings 
face Ocoee or Church Streets and lie between Eleventh 
and Fifteenth Streets. 

Lee Memorial Library, completed in 1941, is the most 
modern building on the campus. The second floor hous- 
es the library and reading room; the first floor con- 
tains the business and executive offices, and the day- 
light basement contains the Visual Aids Room, Corre- 
spondence Department, and Photographic Dark Room. 

The Alumni Building is a modern, four-story brick 
building completed in 1945. It contains the Art Studios 
and most of the classrooms and faculty offices. The 
remaining classrooms are in the Academic Building and 
on the ground floors of Nora Chambers Hall, Simmons 
Hall, and Tharp Hall. 

The Academic Building is a two-story building con- 
taining classrooms and music practice studios. 

The Auditorium seats approximately 850 and con- 
tains a pipe organ, a grand piano, broadcasting studios, 
and other equipment. 

Old Main is the oldest building on the campus. It is 
a four-story brick housing unit for married couples, of 
approximately sixty apartments. It contains piano 



28 LEECOLLEGE 

studios on the fourth floor, a large recreational room 
on the third floor, small auditorium in the north wing 
of the first floor, and a beautifully furnished parlor. 
Several rooms have connecting baths. 

Simmons Hall is a three-story brick dormitory for 
girls. 

Tharp Hall contains apartments for faculty members 
and a beautiful lobby. The ground floor contains the 
laboratories and lecture rooms of the Science Depart- 
ment. 

Nora Chambers Hall, named in honor of the first 
teacher of Lee College, Mrs. Nora B. Chambers, is a 
three-story brick dormitory which houses the Home 
Economics Department, a beautiful parlor, and a recre- 
ational hall on the ground floor. 

Victory Hall contains light housekeeping rooms for 
married students with children. 

College Arms Apartments is an apartment house of 
eight units for faculty members, located on Centenary 
Avenue. 

Ellis Hall is a two-story dormitory named in honor 
of the first superintendent, Reverend J. B. Ellis. 

Walker Hall, the men's dormitory, was completed in 
1945. It is a four-story building and can house approx- 
imately three hundred men. 

North Hall, Battle House, The Jeep, Harmony Hall, 
and other dwellings owned by the school have been 
arranged into apartment houses. 

The Dining Hall seats approximately six hundred and 
the family style of serving is used. The kitchen is ade- 
quately furnished. 

The Gymnasium is located directly behind the audi- 
torium and has dressing rooms and showers for both 
boys and girls. The athletic field is located near by and 
includes a Softball diamond, tennis and volleyball courts. 

The Snack Shop is located on the first floor of the 
east wing of Old Main and has become a very popular 
meeting place for students. 

Melody Hall contains the studios of the piano and 
voice teachers. 

The Post Office is located in the Academic Building. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 29 

STUDENT LIFE 

The student life is rich in activities — religious, musi- 
cal, literary, social, and recreational. 

Whether at work or at play, in personal life or social 
relations, we wish our students to be loyal to the Mas- 
ter, who desires to direct each phase of our lives. 

CHAPEL 

Chapel service is held four mornings a week and has 
become an integral part of the institution. Here the 
entire school meets to seek divine guidance for the day 
and the faculty and students learn to know each other 
better; together they are inspired to strive for more 
efficient service. Students are required to be present at 
all chapel services. 

MUSICAL ACTIVITIES 

In many schools, music is considered an accomplish- 
ment reserved for only the talented few, but from the 
beginning music has been a vital part of student life 
at Lee College. Realizing that spiritually everyone 
needs the inspiration that music brings, the institution 
encourages all students to acquire not only the appreci- 
ation of good, wholesome music, but also to make it the 
medium of expression for their best and truest 
thoughts. Beauty unexcelled can be portrayed in music, 
and spiritual benefit unequaled can be derived from it. 
There is something inspiring in the mass singing of the 
great old hymns. They sound the trumpet of liberty 
and the challenge of man's immortal hope. Then, there 
is nothing so soothing to troubled spirits as a fine melo- 
dy; nothing so uplifting as the charming compositions 
of the old masters. 

The school sponsors several musical organizations, 
but every organization, regardless of its purpose, pro- 
motes music, both in regular meetings and special pro- 
grams. The student services are made interesting by 
the effective music of the school choir, the band, and 
special ensembles. The value of the music rendered by 
the student body cannot be overemphasized. 

The school believes that a student who can sing and 



30 LEECOLLEGE 

make a joyful noise unto the Lord, then live his song, 
has the spirit of victory in his heart — the indomitable 
spirit which reinforces the Christian youth with values 
invisible and eternal. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

The school sponsors student organizations varied 
enough in their activities to include the interest of all. 
While the membership in them is voluntary, all stu- 
dents find it to their advantage to identify themselves 
with at least one of these clubs. Students receive in 
these extracurricular activities a type of training which 
is impossible to be obtained in the classroom. The op- 
portunity for professional and intellectual interests, 
along with the social development, is an invaluable fea- 
ture of student activities. Student clubs and organiza- 
tions wishing to schedule social functions must obtain 
a date from the Social Committee and permission 
through the dormitory supervisors. 

The Alumni Association is an institution that lives in 
the lives of its alumni and prospers as they prosper. In 
May, 1946, the Lee College Alumni Association was 
organized "for the promotion of fellowship among its 
members, for the fostering of a greater school spirit 
among its graduates, for the creation of interest in 
prospective students, and for the promotion of the gen- 
eral progress of the school." 

The constitution provides for three classes of mem- 
bers: Regular members, associate members, and hon- 
orary members. Regular members consist of all grad- 
uates from the Junior College Division ; all graduates 
from the Lee School of Religion ; all graduates from the 
Academy Division. Associate members consist of stu- 
dents who have completed one full term of work with 
satisfactory grades and deportment. Honorary mem- 
bers are admitted to the association by a majority vote 
of the assembly after being recommended by the Exec- 
utive Committee. All members are solicited annually to 
contribute to the association. 

The annual homecoming convention is held each 
spring during Commencement week. Alumni assemble 
and hold a business session ; an entertaining program 



GENERAL INFORMATION 31 

is given by the alumni and a barbecue banquet is given. 

The Alumni News is a section of the Clarion, the 
school publication, which is published monthly. 

State Chapters are organized throughout the states 
in the Union. 

The Senior Class promotes fellowship and good will 
among the seniors and sponsors projects for the im- 
provement of school buildings, campus, and library. 

The Band welcomes to membership students who can 
play any type of band instrument and who wish to re- 
ceive training in ensemble playing. 

The Chorus is one of the active musical organizations 
of the college. Its members are chosen after they have 
undergone tests to determine their fitness. Students in 
all divisions of the school are accepted. 

The Athletic Club endeavors to teach its members 
the principles of good sportsmanship, to improve the 
morale and attitude of the entire student body, and to 
encourage participation in physical education programs. 

The Music Club's purpose is to create interest for 
better music, and to give the students an opportunity 
for performance. 

The Missionary Society's aim is to foster and pro- 
mote a missionary spirit on the campus. Many of its 
members are called to a definite mission field, but 
membership is given to any student especially interest- 
ed in the supreme Christian task of world evangeliza- 
tion. The society encourages systematic missionary in- 
tercession, embracing the entire world in a cycle of 
prayer. 

The Youth for Christ Club was organized to give 
young people training in winning others to Christ. This 
training is made practical by the club members organiz- 
ing mission Sunday Schools and Bible Clubs, and hold- 
ing street services. 

The Spanish Club was organized to promote greater 
interest in the Spanish language and in the peoples of 
the Latin-American countries, to encourage those called 
to missionary work among these people, and to develop 
a spirit of fellowship among the students studying 
Spanish. 



32 LEE COLLEGE 

The French Club was organized for the purpose of 
cultivating interest and proficiency in the French lan- 
guage, especially in its spoken form. 

The Student Council consists of regularly chosen rep- 
resentatives from all classes, and seeks to express the 
sentiment of the students. Through the Student Coun- 
cil, students have a voice in improving the school and 
get training in self-government. 

The Commercial Club was organized for the purpose 
of promoting professional, educational, recreational, in- 
spirational, and social benefits. 

The Nora Chambers Chapter of the Future Teachers 
of America was organized at Lee College in the spring 
of 1949. Its purpose is to attract young people of good 
character and ability to the teaching profession, to de- 
velop ideals and power in its members, and to enrich 
the spirit of college life by providing for all chapter 
members opportunities for unselfish service and pro- 
fessional growth. 

The Dramatics Club was organized to foster interest 
in good drama, to give the members a usable knowledge 
of the technique of directing a play or producing a pro- 
gram, and to develop poise and self-confidence before 
an audience. 

The Lee College Academy Beta Club is affiliated with 
the National Beta Club, which is a high school honor 
society. Its purpose is to promote leadership through 
service. Students are invited to join on the basis of 
character, scholarship (B average is required), and 
loyalty to the school. 

The Home Economics Club is a national organization 
of pupils studying homemaking in high schools and 
colleges of the United States and other territories. The 
club provides opportunities to share in solving prob- 
lems important to home life, and sponsors group pro- 
jects, local, state and national in scope; it increases 
opportunities for the development of leadership and 
intelligent participation in social activities. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 33 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

The Clarion is the name of the school paper. It is 
edited and published monthly by a student staff assist- 
ed by two faculty advisors. 

The Vindagua is the college annual and is published 
yearly by the students. It is a work of art and makes 
an excellent souvenir. 

SOCIAL LIFE 

Since the school is co-educational, provisions have 
been made for social contacts of such a nature as to 
maintain an atmosphere of culture and refinement 
which will fit young men and women for broad social 
living. The management desires all students to meet 
on friendly, social terms. 

The school has always tried to promote a clean every- 
day life. It has been the earnest endeavor of its direc- 
tors to keep student life free from the vices which 
threaten to destroy the Christian faith and virtue of 
our boys and girls. Parents who send their sons and 
daughters to this school may expect that their associ- 
ates shall be with young men and women of good moral 
character. Anyone void of this essential trait need not 
apply for admission. A student whose ideals and man- 
ners are out of harmony with those of right living, be- 
comes a menace to the influence and reputation of a 
school of this kind. For this reason the school refuses 
to retain those who disregard its social regulations. 

Only properly supervised social activity is given a 
place at Lee College. All social functions, hikes, and 
picnics are chaperoned and are subject to the rules and 
regulations of the College. 

Students will not be expected to invite visitors or 
entertain in the dormitory without first getting per- 
mission. 

WEEK-END TRIPS 

The management of the institution will look with dis- 
favor on frequent week-end trips made by students. 
Students cannot expect to make good grades if they 
make week-end trips away from the school. If parents 



52461 



34 LEECOLLEGE 

permit students to go home too frequently, the parents 
must bear the responsibility. 

Except in cases of emergency, students will file ap- 
plications with the college dean for out-of-town trips. 
Applications should be filed three days in advance. In 
cases of students whose parents are responsible for 
their account, forms must be secured from the office 
of the registrar and mailed home for the signature of 
the parents or guardian. 

RECREATION 

The school does not participate in intercollegiate 
athletic contests, but it does afford its students oppor- 
tunities for play and recreation in its program of intra- 
mural sports. Every student is encouraged to spend 
part of his leisure time in recreational activities which 
will develop regular habits of play, physical strength, 
vigor, and sportsmanship. 

LIVING REGULATIONS 

It is the desire of the management to make dormitory 
life as pleasant and homelike as possible, but the stu- 
dent must realize that all the liberties enjoyed at home 
cannot be granted in a college. If the student is to be 
happy, he must adjust himself to the new environment 
and show a friendly and cooperative spirit at all times. 

All students are expected to be thoughtful, courteous, 
and truthful in their dealings with each other, and to 
show due respect for one another. The supervisors are 
anxious to do everything possible for the students, but 
in spite of their efforts, dormitory life is just what the 
students make it. 

The dormitory supervisors are in charge of all dor- 
mitory activities. 

Rooms are assigned by the supervisors, who will 
grant requests where possible. 

Both men and women students are required to occupy 
dormitory rooms until the dormitories are filled. 

Students living in the dormitories are expected to 
care for their rooms and to keep them clean and in 
order, so that the school can maintain a refined atmos- 



GENERAL INFORMATION 35 

phere with good living conditions for all. Students are 
expected to be economical in the use of water, lights, 
and dormitory supplies. Electric hot plates and heaters 
will not be allowed in individual rooms. 

DORMITORY SUGGESTIONS 

All dormitory rooms have hot and cold running water 
and contain closet space or wardrobes, tables or desks, 
chairs, and dressers or chiffoniers. Suggestions are giv- 
en below for women and men students. 

For Women: Rooms are provided with single beds. 
In addition toyour clothingand usual personal supplies, 
you should bring at least : 

1 pillow 8 to 10 towels 

2 pillowcases Bedroom slippers 
2 blankets Housecoat 

4 sheets Raincoat or umbrella 

Due to the variety of window sizes in the women's 
dormitories, you may wish to buy curtains after you 
arrive. Most rooms have one window. Bring whatever 
you wish in the way of small rugs, dresser scarfs, bed- 
spreads, lamps, etc. 

For Men: Rooms are furnished with single beds. In 
addition to your wearing apparel, you will need the 
following : 

1 pillow Bathrobe 

2 single blankets Bedroom slippers 
4 sheets (63" X 99") Window curtains 

2 pillowcases Raincoat or umbrella 

8 to 10 towels 

It will probably be better to buy curtains after you 
arrive. The windows are 3'x5' and all rooms have 
one window. Bring whatever you wish in the way of 
small rugs, lamps, bedspreads, etc. 

STUDENT AID 

We regret that we have no fund or method whereby 
we can help worthy students pay their way through 
school. However, a very limited number are employed 



36 LEECOLLEGE 

part time in the offices, cafeteria, and library. 

In these instances, preference is usually shown to 
second-year students. Only students who have an actual 
need and have ability and promise for the future will 
be employed. 

No one should expect employment who does not 
maintain a good scholastic average and good deport- 
ment. 

All employees of the school who expect to render 
either full or part-time service must report at least one 
day before school begins, and remain one day after 
school closes. 

STUDENT THRIFT-TRAINING 

We urge our students to practice strict economy. 
Students who are careless about meeting their obliga- 
tions, and foolishly spend their money with no regard 
for its value, cannot hope for a prosperous future. 

; Students are not expected to make debts while in 
school, either by purchasing things or borrowing mon- 
ey. 

The school cannot afford to make loans. Students are 
not expected to ask for such favors of the office. 

Students have little or no use for cars during the 
school term. Cars on the campus are detrimental to the 
school, as well as expensive for the student. We suggest 
that cars be stored before school opens. 

Boarding students will not be allowed to own and oper- 
ate motor vehicles without permission from the admin- 
istration. 

DISCIPLINE 

Whenever a body of people is associated for the ac- 
complishment of a definite purpose, regulations and 
discipline are necessary. The act of registration is a 
written agreement to cheerfully comply with all rules 
and regulations of the school. 

At the discretion of the Discipline Committee, students 
who either violate or disregard any rule of the school 
will be penalized. A student may be placed on probation 



GENERAL INFORMATION 37 

under whatever conditions are recommended by the 
Discipline Committee. Any student on probation shall 
have no part in extracurricular activities. 

Demerits will be given for all major offences and 
may, at the discretion of the Discipline Committee, be 
given for minor offences. 

One hundred demerits automatically results in ex- 
pulsion. 

The administration reserves the right to suspend any 
student for any reason when deemed necessary. 

Students who board in the dormitory should enter 
with the understanding that they are under the direct 
supervision of the management. Special attention and 
advice will be given them. The president reserves the 
right to make any investigation concerning their wel- 
fare and to employ whatever disciplinary methods he 
deems necessary. 

Students are under the rules and regulations of the 
school from the time they arrive on the campus. 
Whether they have registered or not, they are subject 
to dormitory, and school regulations. Students are sub- 
ject to school regulations betiveen semesters. Students 
not spending school holidays at home are likewise sub- 
ject to school regulations. 

INFORMATION FOR VETERANS 

Lee College is approved by, and holds contracts with, 
the Veterans Administration for the training of vet- 
erans under Public Law 346 (G. I. Bill of Rights), and 
Public Law 16 (Vocational Rehabilitation Act). The 
financial assistance received by the veteran from the 
government amply covers one's expenses, including 
room and board. The Veterans Administration will pay 
tuition and fees, and furnish books and school supplies 
up to $500 for a nine-month term. Under the G. I. Bill 
of Rights (Public Law 346) , single veterans will receive 
$75 per month; married veterans without children, 
$105 per month; and married veterans with one or 
more children, $120 per month for subsistence. Vet- 
erans training under Public Law 16 will receive consid- 
erably more, according to their disability and number 
in family. 



38 LEE COLLEGE 

Public Law 346 Veterans 

Contact your veterans training officer before you at- 
tempt to transfer from one school to another. This will 
eliminate red tape and eliminate the possibility of los- 
ing your remaining entitlement under the G. I. Bill. 
BE SURE THAT YOU HAVE V.A. APPROVAL BE- 
FORE YOU MAKE ANY CHANGE IN YOUR TRAIN- 
ING STATUS. 

Public Law 16 Veterans 

Contact your veterans training officer and be sure 
that your records have been properly processed before 
you attempt to attend Lee College. Such caution will 
eliminate the possibility of losing your entitlement. 

General Education Development Tests 

Veterans who have not completed high school will be 
benefited by taking the G. E. D. Tests. These tests cov- 
er English, natural science, social sciences, literature, 
and mathematics. Your average score determines the 
grade you are eligible to enter in high school. These 
tests must be taken as specified on the school calendar. 

ADMISSION TO LEE COLLEGE 
How to Apply 

Application blanks are mailed on request to all pro- 
spective students and no one should come expecting to 
enter the institution unless his application has been 
accepted by the management. A preliminary applica- 
tion is included at the end of this catalog. 

A personal letter should accompany the application 
blank. After notice of acceptance has been received, 
one should write the school as to how and when he ex- 
pects to arrive. 

All applications should be on file in the Registrar's 
Office one month before the opening of school. We can- 
not guarantee acceptance of late applications. 

An official transcript from the last school attended 
must be filed in the office of the Registrar before appli- 
cation for admission to the Junior College or the Acad- 
emy can be accepted. These transcripts must be sent 



GENERAL INFORMATION 39 

directly from the office of the last school attended. 

The school offers no courses below the high school 
level. Parents need not make application for children 
who have not satisfactorily completed grammar school. 
This does not apply to persons over eighteen years old 
who wish to register in the Religious Education Divi- 
sion. 

According to the State Department of Education, 
all students are required to take a physical examina- 
tion, a record of which should be sent with the applica- 
tion. No application will be approved and no student 
will be allowed to register until he has taken a physical 
examination. 

ROOM RESERVATION 

Dormitory students who arrive before registration 
day may present the card acknowledging the accep- 
tance of their application and register for room and 
board in the dormitories. These students are expected 
to register immediately upon arrival at the school. 
Dormitories will open September 6, 1952. No student 
should arrive before that day. The cafeteria will open 
Sunday, September 7, at 5 p.m. 

SCHOOL APARTMENTS 

Due to the large percentage of married students at- 
tending Lee College, special efforts have been made 
to provide a maximum number of one- and two-room 
apartments at a minimum cost to the students. Stu- 
dents occupying these rooms and apartments are ex- 
pected to exercise the utmost care in eliminating ex- 
cessive damage to school property. Students will not be 
asked to make a breakage deposit but will be charged 
for any damage to school property for which they may 
be responsible. There will be an inspection of all dormi- 
tory rooms at the beginning and end of each semester. 
The Business Manager will have a list of all furnishings 
in the room with a notation about the condition of same, 
and a duplicate will be given the student when he occu- 
pies the room. The dormitory supervisor will make 
monthly inspection, and any damage found will be 



40 LEECOLLEGE 

charged to the person responsible. 

Two-room apartments will be furnished with one 
double bed, single beds for children, one chest of draw- 
ers, one desk, one table, and not more than four chairs 
(depending upon number of occupants). 

Single rooms for married couples will be supplied 
with the above furnishings with the exception of a 
table. The above information applies to Old Main, Ellis 
Hall, Providence Hall, and Nora Chambers Hall. 

No kitchen equipment is furnished by the school. 

ORIENTATION 

Students will follow the schedule furnished by the 
Registrar's Office throughout registration. Each stu- 
dent will be assigned to a faculty advisor, who will aid 
him in the selection of his courses. 

Absences will be counted beginning with the first 
day of each semester. 

The school reserves the right to ivithdraiv any course 
offered in the catalog if enrollment is less than eight. 

DROPPING COURSES 

No student may drop or add a course of study after 
registration day without the permission of the head of 
his division. 

No add or drop slips should be requested after class- 
es have been in session one week. If drop slips are se- 
cured after this date, which will be designated for each 
semester in the schedule for registration, a charge of 
one dollar for each change will be made. Students who 
drop a course after the date listed in the calendar will 
automatically receive a failing grade for the course. 

WITHDRAWAL 

A student who desires to withdraw from the school 
should obtain and execute the form for withdrawal 
from the Dean's Office. Students failing to do so will 
receive no credit for work done and cannot be given an 
honorable dismissal. 

In the case of a student whose parents or guardians 



GENERAL INFORMATION 41 

are responsible for his account, the school must be 
notified directly by the parent or guardian before the 
student will be allowed to leave the school. 

ABSENCES 

The school considers prompt attendance of all classes 
to be of primary importance. Deliberate cuts will have 
serious effects on a student's academic standing and on 
his chances of graduation, and may incur such addi- 
tional penalties as are provided by the institution's 
regulations. 

VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome to Lee College. Students who 
wish to have overnight guests must obtain permission 
from dormitory supervisors. All such visitors must 
register at the office of the Accountant. No visitor shall 
spend more than two days on the campus without spe- 
cial permission. Prices for visitors will be as follows: 
Room $1.00 per night; meals, 50 cents each. 

ITEMIZED EXPENSES FOR EACH SEMESTER 

(A school term consists of two semesters) 
ALL STUDENTS PAY : 

Religious Education and Junior College Divisions 

Tuition $95.00 

*Matriculation fee 15.00 

Student activity fee (includes admission to 

special school productions and artist series) 5.00 
High School Division 

Tuition $85.00 

* Matriculation fee 15.00 

Student activity fee (includes admission to 

special school productions and artist series) 5.00 
ALL DORMITORY STUDENTS PAY IN ADDITION 
TO ABOVE : 

**Room and Board $144.00 

OTHER EXPENSES, PAID WHEN APPLICABLE : 
Electrical fee (for married resident students) $10.00 
***Late registration fee 5.00 



42 LEECOLLEGE 

Change in schedule after registration unless 
change is recommended by a responsible 

authority 1.00 

Proficiency exams (for each hour's credit es- 
tablished by examination) 1.00 

Radio fee 2.00 

Diploma fee (all divisions) 5.00 

Intrasemester examinations taken at irreg- 
ular times 1.00 

Semester examinations taken at irregular 

times 2.00 

General Educational Development Test, serv- 
ice charge 2.00 

G.E.D. Tests taken at other than scheduled 

time 5.00 

Physical Education fee (required of all stu- 
dents taking Physical Education) 5.00 

Extra transcripts (one given free) 1.00 

Laboratory fee — Chemistry, Biology, and 

Physics (all divisions) 5.00 

Home Economics I and II fee 2.50 

Typing fee 5.00 

Secretarial Practice fee 5.00 

Manual Arts 5.00 

Visual Aids (D.V.B.S.) 2.00 

Yearbook Picture fee 1.75 

*Students attending only one semester are charged $17.50 
in order to cover yearbook charge. 

** Students are required to occupy dormitory rooms until 
they are filled, unless living with parents or close rela- 
tive. 
***Students registering other than at the scheduled time 
will be charged this fee. 

INDIVIDUAL LESSONS IN MUSIC 
Per Semester 

Mrs. Meta Sherman — Piano, Organ 

One one-half-hour lesson per week $27.50 

Two one-half-hour lessons per week .. _ 45.00 

Voice lessons not giving college credit, but giv- 
ing Religious Education credit 

One one-half-hour lesson per week 20.00 

Two one-half-hour lessons per week 35.00 



GENERAL INFORMATION 43 

Piano and Instrumental lessons not giving col- 
lege credit, but giving Religious Education 
credit 

One one-half-hour lesson per week 18.00 

Two one-half-hour lessons per week 32.00 

Private lessons are taught on the semester basis and 
not on an individual basis; i.e., students are charged 
for the semester instead of for each individual lesson. 
Therefore, students will not be allowed to make up 
private lessons missed due to school holidays or for 
other reasons that classroom courses do not meet. No 
student will be allowed to make up a private lesson that 
he misses for reasons other than dire emergencies un- 
less make-up fee is paid. 

RENTAL FEES 

All School Instruments 

One hour per day per semester $5.00 

Two hours per day per semester 8.00 

SETTLEMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

Students should be prepared to pay the semester's 
charges on the day of registration. Money may be re- 
mitted to the Bookkeeping Department in advance, if 
desired ; this will facilitate the registration of the stu- 
den on registration day. Students who are not able to 
pay their accounts in full must make application for 
deferment of a portion of the account, and upon ap- 
proval may subscribe to the following installment plan : 

Tuition and matriculation fee must be paid on regis- 
tration day. Registration will not be considered com- 
plete until this is done. Any person who pays his tuition, 
or any part of it, after registration day will be charged 
the late registration fee of $5.00. Room and board for 
the first semester may be paid in four equal install- 
ments. The first installment shall be paid at the time 
of registration and the remaining three installments 
shall be paid on the first day of each successive month. 

Private lessons shall be paid for in advance at the 
time the student registers for them. 



44 LEE COLLEGE 

The school has a limited number of apartments for 
married couples. Rents on apartments are payable in 
advance. Rent for one month must be paid on day of 
occupancy and thereafter on the first day of each suc- 
ceeding month of the term. Students may pay apart- 
ment rents for the entire semester on day of registra- 
tion. Students who desire apartments should apply in 
advance for them in order to insure getting a place to 
live. 

Only one dormitory will be open during the Christmas 
holidays. Students occupying apartments during the holi- 
days will be charged regular rent. 

ADJUSTMENT OF ACCOUNTS 

No refund will be granted unless application is made 
within two weeks of any change in program or depar- 
ture of the student. If a student withdraws during a 
semester and requests refund for advanced payments, 
the following rules will determine the amount refund- 
ed: 

1. Room and board will be refunded in full amount 
unused to date of withdrawal. 

2. Tuition and rental fees will be refunded on the 
following percentages: First through second week, 90 
per cent ; third through fourth week, 75 per cent ; fifth 
through the sixth week, 50 per cent; seventh through 
the ninth week, 25 per cent; NO REFUND AFTER 
THE NINTH WEEK. 

3. NO REFUND ON MATRICULATION FEE. 

Accounts with the school must be settled in full be- 
fore a diploma or a transcript of credit is issued or a 
letter of honorable dismissal granted. SATISFAC- 
TORY FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS MUST BE 
MADE BEFORE FINAL EXAMINATIONS CAN BE 
TAKEN. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Students who register for private lessons only will 
not be charged a matriculation fee. Special students 
who do not board at the school, and who register for 



GENERAL INFORMATION 45 

a part-time course in any division, will be charged as 
follows : 

In the High School Division there will be a charge of 
$25 per semester for each course of study. In the Re- 
ligious Education and Junior College Divisions there 
will be a flat charge of $8.00 per semester hour. Special 
students must pay cash for the semester on day of 
registration. 

No person who registers as a full-time student and 
is later permitted to drop enough courses to place him 
in the classification of a special student will be entitled 
to a refund or prorated tuition, unless the readjust- 
ment of his course of study is made on or before the 
date appearing in the school calendar as the last day 
in which a student may register. 

Matriculation fee will not be refunded in any case. 



Junior College 



The establishment of a Junior College for the Church 
of God was prompted by the principles that higher 
education should be encouraged among its young people. 

The preservation and improvement of the Church in 
the modern world depends on the full and unhampered 
development of all potential leadership resources. 

The basic functional philosophy of the Junior College 
is to provide a general education designed to develop 
within its pupils such appreciations, understandings, 
abilities, and attitudes as are needed for responsible 
Christian living in the home and in the community. 

Broadly understood, "responsible Christian living" 
includes not only social and personal adequacy, but also 
a sense of economic self-sufficiency, as well as intellec- 
tual and spiritual insight into the problems of human 
relations. It is hoped that with such insights the pupils 
may be enabled to make enlightened choices and thus 
better serve God and man. 

For this reason the curricular offerings are designed 
to develop within each pupil : 

1. An understanding of himself, his own mental and 
social life, also that of his associates, that he may gain 
insight into the motives and behavior of others. 

2. An understanding of the nature and problems of 
organized society, past and present, and his relation 
to it. 

3. An understanding of the world in which he lives, 
both organic and inorganic, in theory and practice. 

4. An appreciation of enduring spiritual values in 
which he will become increasingly aware of Christianity 
as a vital part of life. 

5. Vocational efficiency. 

The work of this department is organized as the 
Lower Division, or freshman and sophomore years, of 
the four-year college. Most of the basic courses which 

46 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 47 

are required of all candidates for a degree are concen- 
trated in these two years. It is so general in character 
that it affords effective training, but is preparatory to 
specialization in the Upper Division, or junior and sen- 
ior years, of the four-year college. A student may elect 
courses during the freshman and sophomore years 
which will furnish a background for advanced work in 
the field in which he expects to choose his major study. 
This major should be selected by the beginning of the 
sophomore year. If the student plans his course of 
study according to the curricular recommended by the 
college, he will be better able to meet the Upper Divi- 
sion requirements as a candidate for the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Application 

Students desiring to make application for the Junior 
College should complete the preliminary application 
blank at the end of this catalog, and mail to the Reg- 
istrar. 

Admission by Certificate 

A graduate of an accredited high school must have 
an official transcript sent directly from the office of 
the high school before an application will be accepted. 
Students will be granted admission to the college upon 
the receipt of fifteen units of work satisfactorily done. 

High School subjects which may be offered for en- 
trance : 

CLASS A 





Maximum 




Maximum 




Units 




Units 


English 


4 


Performance 


1 


Foreign Language 




Mathematics 




French 


3 


Algebra 


2 


German 


3 


Trigonometry 


y 2 


Latin 


4 


Plane Geometry 


i 


Greek 


3 


Solid Geometry 


y 2 


Spanish 


3 


Sociology 


i 


Music 




Physiography 


i 


Appreciation 


1 


Physiology 


i 


Harmony 


1 


Zoology 


i 



48 LEECOLLEGE 

Biology 1 Civics 1 

Chemistry 1 Economics 1 

General Science 1 History 4 

Physics 1 Botany 1 

CLASS B 

Maximum Maximum 

Units Units 

Agriculture 2 Home Economics 3 

Arithmetic (Business) 1 Shopwork 2 

Business Subjects 3 Vocational Teachers 

Drawing 2 Training 3 

General Mathematics 1 

Unit: Represents thirty-six weeks' study in a subject 
in high school, classes meeting five times per week. 

For entrance to the College of Liberal Arts, at least 
three of these units must be in English ; one unit should 
be in Math., and enough electives from Group A to 
make 10 units. The other five units may be chosen in 
any of the subjects in either Group A or Group B. 

All students in the Junior College will be required to 
take at least one year of foreign language, except stu- 
dents of Business Administration. A student who has 
had no foreign language in high school may enter a 
first-year college class in the foreign language of his 
choice. Students who have had two or three years in 
one foreign language in high school may enter the sec- 
ond-year class of that language. Credit will be given for 
foreign languages. 

Admission by Examination 

Non-veterans who are not high school graduates, but 
have been issued an equivalency diploma by a State 
Department of Education, will be considered for admis- 
sion to the Freshman Class of the Junior College. (Fur- 
ther information concerning this equivalency diploma 
can be obtained from the State Department of Educa- 
tion in the respective states.) 

Admission of Students with Advanced Standing 

The Junior College will admit without examination 
students from other accredited colleges or universities 
provided they have been granted honorable dismissal. 
They must present an official transcript showing work 
done. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 49 

Except in special cases, a student who has failed in 
another institution and cannot remain in that institu- 
tion will not be admitted to the Junior College. 

Removal of entrance conditions must be accom- 
plished by the end of the first year. 

In general, Lee College follows the same policy in 
accepting work from a school that is not a member 
of a regional association as followed by the state uni- 
versity of the state in which the school is located. 

Admission of Veterans 

Veterans who have not completed high school may 
take G. E. D. Tests on the dates listed in the school 
calendar. If they make the necessary average and can 
present four regular high school units of satisfactory 
work, they will be admitted to the Junior College. If 
they cannot present four units, then they will be re- 
quired to take four high school units before admission 
as a regular Junior College student. In most cases it is 
advisable for veterans who are not high school grad- 
uates to complete English IV in high school division. 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM WORK 

The number of semester hours of work required for 
completion of each year of the curriculum is established 
by the college. The normal load for a semester for all 
students is fifteen semester hours. Students with an 
established record of superior quality may take a max- 
imum of nineteen hours, provided the application is 
properly approved at the time of registration. The min- 
imum load to be classed as a full-time student is twelve 
hours. Students who are not doing satisfactory work be- 
cause of their inability to carry a full schedule may be 
requested by a faculty advisor to drop one or more 
courses. 

Requirements for graduation from the Junior College 
are a minimum of sixty semester hours and sixty qual- 
ity point, or a minimum average grade of C. As a gen- 
eral rule, not more than sixty-two semester hours are 
accepted by a senior college. 



50 LEE COLLEGE 

SCHOLASTIC SYSTEM 

The work of all students is graded by letters, which 
may be interpreted as follows: 

A (Excellent) 3 quality points per semester hour 

B (Good) 2 quality points per semester hour 

C (Average) 1 quality point per semester hour 

D (Passing) quality points per semester hour 

F (Failure) quality points per semester hour 

I (Incomplete) Grade withheld because of prolonged 
illness, or other valid excuse. 

An Incomplete must be removed within six weeks, 
otherwise it becomes a failure 

GUIDANCE PROGRAM 

Upon being admitted to Junior College, each student 
is assigned to a member of the faculty, who acts as his 
faculty advisor. The advisor is to assist the student in 
selecting his subjects so as to secure a well-rounded 
course of study and also to help him understand the 
requirements for graduation. The responsibility for the 
selection of courses rests upon the student. It is very 
important that the student meet the requirements of 
his course in their proper order so that in his senior 
year he will be eligible for graduation. At the begin- 
ning of each semester, the student is required to con- 
sult his advisor on his choice of subjects. During the 
semester he is urged to consult his advisor often. 

A student who expects to continue his studies in a 
senior college is urged to acquaint himself with the re- 
quirements of the college which he expects to attend 
and to plan his program in accordance with the require- 
ments of that college. The faculty advisor will be glad 
to assist the student in coordinating his program of 
studies with the senior college he expects to attend. 

Lee College also administers Reading Tests, English 
Placement Tests, and Psychological Aptitude Tests to 
all College Freshmen. Interest Tests are also offered. 
These tests act as a basis for counseling students who 
need help in properly evaluating their abilities and 
interests. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 51 

REGISTRATION 
Freshman Period 

This period will be devoted to registration, confer- 
ences with advisors, assignment to classes, and lectures 
of importance to new students. 

Any student who registers late will be charged a 
service fee of five dollars. 

Classes begin Friday, September 11, at 8 a.m. o'clock. 
Absences will be counted beginning with the first day 
the class meets. 

No student may enter a class for credit after the date 
given in the school calendar, which is on pages 15 and 
16 of this catalog. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 
Conduct 

Every student is expected to be a lady or a gentle- 
man at all times ; diligent in study ; prompt and regular 
in attendance to classes, chapel, church, examinations, 
and to all duties assigned him. 

ABSENCES 

All students are expected to attend all classes ex- 
cept in cases of emergency such as sickness of self or 
of a member of the immediate family. There are no 
cuts that a student may take without risk of serious 
after effects. A student may take without penalty as 
many unexcused cuts for each course as there are 
semester hours credit in the course. Provided there are 
no additional cuts, excused or unexcused, there will be 
no penalty. However, in case there are additional cuts, 
excused or unexcused, one quality point for each addi- 
tional cut will be deducted from the permanent record. 
For examnle, a student taking a course carrying three 
semester hours of credit would not be penalized if he 
took three unexcused cuts during the semester ; but if 
he had to take other cuts after he had taken three 
unexcused cuts, then each additional cut would result 
in one quality point deduction from the permanent rec- 
ord of the student. A shortage of quality points will 



52 LEE COLLEGE 

keep an individual from graduating. Each unexcused 
cut beyond one for each semester hour of credit the 
course carries ivill result in the loss of one hour of cred- 
it per cut in the course or courses in ivhich the excess- 
ive cuts occur. 

Examinations 

Regular examinations are held at the mid-semester 
and at the end of the semester. Periodic examinations 
may be given from time to time at the discretion of the 
instructor. 

Change of Schedule and Dropping Courses 

Students will be assigned to the courses according 
to the curriculum that they choose. As far as possible 
students will be allowed to elect certain courses as 
electives according to personal preference and needs. 
Once a student has registered for a course he will not 
be allowed to drop the course unless permission is first 
granted by the dean, registrar, or faculty advisor. 
There is a day set aside for necessary changes of 
schedule of the students where certain circumstances 
make a change necessary. There will be no charge for 
changes made at this time. Changes made later will 
necessitate the payment of a $1.00 change of schedule 
fee. Students will not be allowed to go to a class for 
awhile and then stop attending the class. Each unex- 
cused cut beyond the allowable cuts (see Absences) 
will result in the loss of one quality point from the 
permanent record. BE SURE THAT YOU HAVE 
BEEN CLEARED THROUGH THE OFFICE OF THE 
REGISTRAR BEFORE YOU STOP ATTENDING A 
COURSE IN WHICH YOU ARE REGISTERED. 

Poor Scholarship 

A student who fails to pass fifty per cent of his 
work in any semester must apply for permission to 
register for any succeeding semester. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Associate in Arts Degree 

Students who have completed satisfactorily two full 
years of college work with a minimum of sixty hours 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 53 

credit and sixty quality points are awarded the degree 
of Associate in Arts. In order to receive this degree, 
the candidate must meet the requirements of the de- 
partment from which he graduates. 

A. For the Liberal Arts Student 

This curriculum is designed to afford the student a 
well-balanced cultural training. The requirements are 
proportionally distributed in the three general fields 
of the humanities, the social sciences, and the natural 
sciences. It provides the foundation of general knowl- 
edge for the student preparing for the liberal profes- 
sions, such as law, journalism, fine arts, and theology. 
Even students who are preparing for a teaching career 
are advised to choose this curriculum in preference to 
the one outlined for the prospective teacher. Students 
enrolled in this course will be required to take at least 
fifty semester hours of basic courses. The remaining 
hours may be elected from music, art, and Bible, or 
other courses desired. 



Freshmen 


Hours 


Sophomore Hours 


English 11.1, 112 


6 


English 211, 212 6 


Foreign Language 


6* 


Foreign Language 6* 


Bible 111, 112 


6 


Art or Music 4 


Science or Math 


6-8 


Psychology 211, 212 6 


Social Science 


6 


Elective (Basic hours) 8 



Total 31-33 Total 30 

The Science requirement may be satisfied by taking 
Chemistry, Biology, Mathematics, or Physics. 

The Social Science requirement may be satisfied by 
the election of one of the following : Sociology 211-212 ; 
History 111-112, 211-212; Economics 211-212. 

The electives in the sophomore year should be chosen 
for their contribution toward a well-rounded lower di- 
vision program and for their value in preparation for 
the prospective upper division program. 

* Students planning to enter a teacher's college or other 
college that does not require a language may be exempt from 
the language requirement provided proper arrangements are 
made with the dean or registrar. Those thus exempt will take 
12 additional hours of basic courses. 



54 LEECOLLEGE 

B. Commerce Major 

The college offers two curriculums in commerce. The 
course of study suggested for the terminal student is 
intended to prepare one for office or secretarial work 
upon graduation. This course is not advised for the 
student who plans to transfer to a four-year institution 
for a degree in commerce. The transfer student should 
take the suggested preparatory curriculum which pre- 
pares one for immediate employment also, but is less 
specialized in nature. The student is not compelled to 
choose between the two before the beginning of the 
sophomore year, since the two courses are so similar 
for freshmen. 

Students who have had adequate preparation in the 
elementary principles of typewriting, shorthand, or 
bookkeeping in their high school work will be exempt 
from such elementary courses as would tend to dupli- 
cate any previous course work. Such students will take 
the intermediate courses for which their previous study 
has prepared them, and they will take the remaining 
hours required for graduation in a broad academic 
field. 

Terminal Course in Commerce 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. 

English 111 3 English 112 3 

Typewriting 111 3 Typewriting 112 3 

Shorthand 131 3 Shorthand 132 3 

Mathematics 141 3 Mathematics 142 3 

*Music 111 or Bible 111 3 *Music 112 or Bible 112 3 
Orientation 101 1 — 

— 15 

16 

SECOND YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Typewriting 211 or 221 3 Typewriting 212 or 222 3 
Shorthand 231 3 Shorthand 232 3 

Accounting 241 3 Accounting 242 3 

Economics 211 3 Economics 212 3 

15 15 

*The student will be expected to elect music one semester 
and Bible the other. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 55 

Preparatory Course in Commerce 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. 

English 111 3 English 112 3 

Typewriting 111 3 Typewriting 112 3 

Shorthand 131 3 Shorthand 132 3 

Foreign Language 3 Foreign Language 3 

Music 111, or Bible 3 Music 112, or Bible 3 

Orientation 101 1 — 



16 



15 



SECOND YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. Course Sem. Hrs. Cr. 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Economics 211 3 Economics 212 3 

Accounting 241 3 Accounting 242 3 

Social Science or Psy. 3 Soc. Science or Psy. 3 

Mathematics 141 3 Mathematics 142 3 

15 15 

C. Terminal Course in Religion 

The Junior College Division of Lee College has two 
distinct aims: 

1. To give adequate preparatory work to the student 
who wishes to take a baccalaureate degree. Particular 
efforts are made to provide standard preparatory work 
in liberal arts and business administration. 

2. To give terminal work for the student who does 
not plan to continue his formal training beyond junior 
college graduation. Terminal courses are offered in the 
fields of religion and office, or secretarial work. The 
terminal course in religion is intended primarily for 
ministers. The objective is to give the young minister 
or prospective minister the fundamentals of ministerial 
training, plus some essentials in general and cultural 
aspects of a junior college education. The course is 
terminal in nature, and is not planned for the student 
who will transfer and do further work leading to a 
baccalaureate degree. The ministerial student who 
plans to continue his college work beyond the junior 
college level usually will find it more advisable to 
choose the liberal arts curriculum and elect such re- 



56 LEE COLLEGE 

ligious courses as are permitted and as best fit his in- 
dividual needs. Faculty advisors and administrators are 
always ready and most helpful in assisting the student 
in choosing the curriculum which best fits his needs in 
arranging his program of studies. 

Requirements for entrance into the terminal course 
for ministers are the same as those for entrance into 
any other course of study in the Junior College Division 
and will be found on pages 47-49. Prospective ministers 
and religious workers who do not have a minimum of 
15 high school units will enroll in the Religious Educa- 
tion Division where they will be required to spend three 
years, instead of two, in training, at the end of which 
they may receive the diploma from the Religious Edu- 
cation Division, provided such quantitative and qualita- 
tive requirements as are outlined for that division have 
been satisfactorily met. The quantitative and qualita- 
tive requirements for graduation from junior college 
terminal courses are the same as those set forth for 
graduation from preparatory courses, and graduates 
from terminal courses are awarded the standard junior 
college diploma. 

The ministerial student enrolled in the terminal 
course in religion will follow the curriculum outlined. 
Permission for any variation from this program must 
be granted by the dean of the college in advance of 
registration for the semester in which such variation 
occurs. Such variation will be permitted only in the 
case of demonstrated efficiency in the subject from 
which the student is exempt, or upon proof of previous 
academic training of adequate nature in such a field. 
The student who is exempt from any course will be 
assigned another course of similar nature in substi- 
tution. 

Terminal Curriculum for Ministerial Students 

FIRST YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Course Sem. Hrs. Course Sem. Hrs. 

English 111 3 English 112 3 

Bible 111 3 Bible 112 3 

Bible 121 3 Bible 122 3 

Speech 111 3 Speech 112 3 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 57 

History 121 3 History 142 ch. 3 

Orientation 1 — 

— 15 

16 

SECOND YEAR 

First Semester Second Semester 

Course Sem. Hrs. Course Sem. Hrs. 

English 211 3 English 212 3 

Bible 221 3 Bible 222 3 

Speech 231 2 Speech 232 2 

Church Leadership 241 2 Church Leadership 242 2 

Music and Hymnology Music and Hymnology 

201 2 202 2 
Psychology or Soci- Psychology or Soci- 
ology 211 3 ology 212 3 

- 15 15 

MUSIC OFFERED AT LEE COLLEGE 

Good music has always been an important part of 
the Christian tradition. This one historical fact, even 
if there were no other reason, would be cause enough 
for the Music Department of Lee College to furnish 
opportunities for students to become acquainted with 
the finest type of sacred music, as well as other music 
in the classic field. Students who plan to become minis- 
ters are urged to acquaint themselves with the best of 
religious music so that they can use it in their future 
ministry. All students are encouraged to think of music 
as an integral part of the liberal education offered by 
Lee College. 

One of the basic aspects of music appreciation in- 
volves an active participation in some form of musical 
activity ; most students, regardless of their background, 
should elect to participate in a musical organization as a 
means of acquainting themselves with the best in musi- 
cal literature, thereby increasing their appreciation of 
music. 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

Everyday Art 

101. ART 

Everyday objects, such as clothing and dress ac- 
cessories, buildings, interiors, and household ob- 



58 LEECOLLEGE 

jects are analyzed to develop good taste in every- 
day living. Three hours per week. Three se- 
mester hours credit one semester. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

111. TYPEWRITING 

A comprehensive study of the technique of "touch 
typing." A well-planned, carefully developed ser- 
ies of letter, figure, and word drills. A study of 
the various parts of the typewriter, and the care 
of the machine, as well as the manipulation of the 
different parts. Five hours per week. Three se- 
mester hours credit. 

112. TYPEWRITING 

Continuation of sentence drills; the development 
of additional skills, techniques, and the typing of 
letters. Prerequisite: Typewriting 111 or one year 
of high school typing. Five hours per week. Three 
semester hours credit. 

131. SHORTHAND 

A course in the basic principles of Gregg Short- 
hand introduced through lessons in reading short- 
hand plates, in writing shorthand forms, and drills 
from dictation. Special attention is given to flu- 
ency in reading and writing. Five hours per week. 
I 1 ' Three semester hours credit. 

132. SHORTHAND 

A continuation of Shorthand 131. Prerequisite: 
Shorthand 131 or one year in high school. Five 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

141. MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE 

This course is given primarily for students of 
Commerce. It consists of a review of algebra, 
ratio, proportion and percentage, simple interest, 
discount, exponents and radicals, quadratic equa- 
tions, binominal theorem and logarithms. Prere- 
quisite: one year of high school algebra. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

142. MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE 
Continuation of 141. Special emphasis given to 
compound interest, annuities, life insurance, ordi- 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 59 

nary annuities, amortization and sinking funds, 
bonds and depreciation. Three hours per week. 
Three semester hours credit. 

211. TYPEWRITING 

Special emphasis given to speed and accuracy in 
continuous writing, mastery of tabulation, manu- 
script typing, and stenciling. Prerequisite: Typ- 
ing 112 or two years of high school typing. Five 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

212. TYPEWRITING 

Continuation of 211. Typing of reports, legal doc- 
uments, rough drafts, and various office forms. 
Five hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

231. SHORTHAND 

Dictation of new material at the rate of 60, 80, 
and 100 words a minute for a continuous interval 
of time. A reasonable reading and transcription 
rate with a mailable transcript is required; lec- 
tures and sermons submitted in manuscript form 
are required. Prerequisite : Shorthand 132, or two 
years of high school shorthand. Five hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 

232. SHORTHAND 

Continuation of 231. Dictation is given on new 
material at the rate of 100 and 120 words per 
minute for a continuous period of time. Higher 
rates may also be emphasized for shorter periods 
of time. Five hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

241. ACCOUNTING 

Elementary accounting. A basic course in book- 
keeping and accounting theory, requiring no pre- 
vious knowledge of bookkeeping. Two lectures and 
two hours laboratory. Three semester hours credit. 

242. ACCOUNTING 

A continuation of the basic principles of account- 
ing for proprietorship, purchases, sales, fixed as- 
sets and deferred charges, negotiable instruments, 
taxes, and a practice set for a wholesale mer- 
chant. Prerequisite: Accounting 221. Two lectures 
and two hours laboratory. Three semester hours 
credit. 



60 LEECOLLEGE 

221. SECRETARIAL PRACTICE 

This course covers the general problems of a sec- 
retary, including personality improvements, use 
of office forms and supplies, filing, handling mail 
and shipments, telegraphic service, editorial du- 
ties, legal principles, office machines, and person- 
al work of the employer. Prerequisite : Business 
Administration 132. Three hours per week. Three 
semester hours credit. 

222. SECRETARIAL PRACTICE 

Business English and a shorthand speed course 
in business letters and speech material. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

ECONOMICS 

211. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

A study of the principles and problems associated 
with the production, exchange, and use of wealth. 
Three hours per week. Three semester hours 
credit. 

212. PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS 

A continuation of Economics 211. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 

EDUCATION 

111. ORIENTATION IN EDUCATION 

A general survey of the field of education for the 
prospective teacher. It aims to orient the student 
in the field of teaching by a consideration of the 
objectives, functions, needs, and opportunities of 
the school in a modern democratic society. Special 
emphasis is given to the compensations and de- 
mands of the teaching profession. Two hours per 
week. Two semester hours credit. Offered both 
semesters. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION 

201. AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS 

Presentation, demonstration, and discussion of 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 61 

various types of audio-visual devices, with experi- 
ence in producing some practical materials and 
operation of projectors. Two hours per week. Two 
semester hours credit. 

202. DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL 

A study of all phases of the vacation church school 
with demonstrations, survey of available materi- 
als, and production of various handicrafts. Two 
hours per week. Two semester hours credit. 

ENGLISH 

99. REMEDIAL ENGLISH 

This is a non-credit course in grammar and good 
usage of English for freshmen who are found by 
a placement test to be deficient in this subject. 
Every effort is made to teach the student to write 
and speak correctly and forcibly, and to read un- 
derstandingly. Theme writing and parallel reading 
are required. Two hours per week. 

111. ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

A review of grammar and punctuation and a study 
of the fundamentals of composition. Students are 
introduced to various types of literature and giv- 
en opportunity to express themselves in original 
writings. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

112. ENGLISH COMPOSITION 

A continuation of 111, with special emphasis on 
original writings. Three hours per week. Three 
semester hours credit. 

211. THE LITERATURE OF ENGLAND 

A survey course from 449-1784. The course in- 
cludes the historical background for English lit- 
erature, the biographies and works of the leading 
authors of this period, and collateral research re- 
ports. Prerequisite: English 111-112. Three hours 
per week. Three semester hours credit. 

212. THE LITERATURE OF ENGLAND 

A continuation of 211, for the period 1760-1832. 



62 LEECOLLEGE 

A study of versification, including stanza forms, 
types of sonnets, and scansion. Collateral reports. 
Prerequisite: English 111-112. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 
222. SURVEY OF AMERICAN LITERATURE 

A brief survey of American writers from the 
colonial period to the present day. A brief intro- 
duction is given to the work of Edwards, Frank- 
lin, Freneau, Irving, Bryant, Emerson, Thoreau, 
Hawthorne, Whittier, Lowell, Poe, Melville, Long- 
fellow, Holmes, Whitman, Lanier, Dickinson, 
Twain, Riley, Markham, Robinson, and Frost. 
Some attention will be given to the literary con- 
tributions of political leaders and political thought 
of the various periods. Prerequisite: English 111, 
112. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

GEOGRAPHY 

211. INTRODUCTION TO GEOGRAPHY 

The aim of this course is to explain why man has 
settled the earth in the way it is settled, what 
makes one particular region of the world differ- 
ent from the others, and what things the various 
regions of the world have in common. Considera- 
tion is given to all the important vegetation areas 
of the world. Three hours per week. Three se- 
mester hours credit first semester. 

212. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY 

Prerequisite: Geography 211. Economic geogra- 
phy deals with the occupations of hunting, fish- 
ing, grazing, forest industries, mining, agriculture 
manufacturing, transportation, and trade. An at- 
tempt is made to explain why some regions of the 
world are prominent in the production and ex- 
portation of various articles and why others are 
significant in the importation and utilization of 
these articles. Special emphasis is given to the 
agricultural and manufactural aspect of economic 
geography. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit second semester. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 63 

HISTORY 

111. SURVEY OF MODERN CIVILIZATION 
(PRELITERARY TIME-1500) 

A general survey course of the economic, reli- 
gious, cultural, and political background of civili- 
zation. Emphasis is placed upon major movements 
and institutions in order to give the student a 
background for other studies and for the inter- 
pretation of the rapidly changing world condi- 
tions. Three hours per week. Three semester hours 
credit. 

112. SURVEY OF MODERN CIVILIZATION 
(1500-PRESENT) 

A continuation of History 111. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 

211. AMERICAN HISTORY 

A history of the American people and their rela- 
tionship to the world, with special emphasis upon 
the United States and its development down to 
the Civil War. Three hours per week. Three se- 
mester hours credit. 

212. AMERICAN HISTORY 

A continuation of History 211, from the Civil War 
down to the present time. Three hours per week. 
Three semester hours credit. 
222. RECENT WORLD HISTORY 

A survey of the world in the twentieth century, 
with special reference to events leading up to 
Word War II and to affairs relative to post World 
War II. Two hours per week. Two semester hours 
credit. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

101, 102. ELEMENTARY CLOTHING CONSTRUC- 
TION, TEXTILES 

Fundamental principles of selection and construc- 
tion applied to garments using cotton, linen, and 
various fabrics. Study and use of commercial pat- 
terns. Principles of fitting. Use and care of sewing 
machine. Emphasis is placed on personal groom- 
ing, basic textile study, selection of appropriate 



64 LEE COLLEGE 

clothing, clothing costs, commodity study of arti- 
cles included in the wardrobe, and care of cloth- 
ing. Three hours per week. Three semester hours 
credit each semester. 
111. FOODS AND NUTRITION 

A basic study of the principles of food prepara- 
tion and selection with an introduction to the 
planning and serving of meals. One recitation, two 
laboratory periods per week. Three semester 
hours credit one semester. 

LANGUAGES 
MODERN LANGUAGE 

French 

111-112. ELEMENTARY FRENCH 

A course for beginners in easy written and spoken 
French. Thorough drill and practice. Three hours 
per week. Three semester hours credit each se- 
mester. 
211-212. INTERMEDIATE FRENCH 

A review of grammar, reading of short stories 
and selections from the Bible in French. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit each 
semester. 

German 

111. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

A course for beginners, with careful drill in pro- 
nunciation and sentence structure. Some easy 
reading, including selections from the Bible in 
German. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

112. ELEMENTARY GERMAN 

A continuation of German 111. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 
211. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

Grammar review. The reading of German stories, 
plays, and the memorizing of some German poems. 
The use of longer selections from the Bible. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 65 

212. INTERMEDIATE GERMAN 

A continuation of German 211, with more conver- 
sation. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

Spanish 

111. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 

Intensive study of Spanish grammar and syntax, 
frequent written work, class drill in conversation 
and pronunciation, reading with oral discussion, 
dictation. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

112. ELEMENTARY SPANISH 

Continuation of Spanish 111, with special empha- 
sis on reading of short stories, grammar and con- 
versation. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

211. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

Reading and composition. Reading in prose with 
reports written in Spanish. Dictation. Three hours 
per week. Three semester hours credit. 

212. INTERMEDIATE SPANISH 

Continuation of 211. Review of grammar. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

MATHEMATICS 

101. GENERAL MATHEMATICS 

This course is designed to develop the student's 
appreciation of mathematics by a brief study of 
the development of the subject from its early 
stages through to the perfection of our present 
number system. Emphasis is placed on mathe- 
matics as a way of thinking. The course also of- 
fers a review in the fundamental operations, frac- 
tions, decimals, percentage, and the logic of ge- 
ometry and algebra. Three hours per week. Three 
semester hours credit. 

102. CONSUMER MATHEMATICS 

This course includes a unit on statistics, better 
buymanship, consumer credit, budgets, invest- 
ments, insurance, and taxation. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 



66 LEECOLLEGE 

111. INTRODUCTION TO COLLEGE ALGEBRA 
Elementary topics, factoring, fractions, rectangu- 
lar coordinates and graphs, exponents, radicals, 
linear equations, quadratics and functions. Pre- 
requisites: One year of high school algebra and 
plane geometry. Three hours per week. Three se- 
mester hours credit. 

112. COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

Ratio, proportion, progressions, binominal the- 
orem, theory of equations, functions and varia- 
bles, inequalities, partial fractions, and deter- 
minants. Prerequisites: Math. Ill or advanced al- 
gebra in high school. Three hours per week. Three 
semester hours credit. 
121. PLANE TRIGONOMETRY 

Functions of angels, formulas, identities, solution 
of right and oblique triangles. Prerequisites : Plane 
geometry and Math. Ill, or advanced algebra in 
high school. Three hours per week. Three semes- 
ter hours credit 

141. MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE 

This course is given primarily for students of 
Commerce. It consists of a review of algebra, 
ratio, proportion and percentage, simple interest, 
discount, exponents and radicals, quadratic equa- 
tions, binominal theorem and logarithms. Prere- 
quisite: One year of high school algebra. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

142. MATHEMATICS OF FINANCE 
Continuation of 141. Special emphasis is given to 
compound interest, annuities, life insurance, ordi- 
nary annuities, amortization and sinking funds, 
bonds and depreciation. Three hours per week. 
Three semester hours credit. 

MUSIC 
Music Courses 

101. MIXED CHORUS 

Training and practice in singing and musical per- 
formance in groups. Admission on approval of the 
instructor in charge. One semester hour credit. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 67 

102. MIXED CHORUS 

A continuation of Music 101. One semester/hour 
credit. 

103. BAND 

Training and practice in the techniques of band 
music. Open to those who play band instruments. 
One semester hour credit. 

104. BAND 

A continuation of Music 103. One semester hour 
credit. 

105. 106. COLLEGE CHOIR 

Select group of voices. Training in the field of 
anthem and hymn singing. Admission only by ap- 
proval of instructor. Two hours per week. One 
semester hour credit each semester. 
Ill, 112. MUSIC HISTORY AND APPRECIATION 
A course designed to foster a love for, and an 
understanding of, music through the study of the 
various periods of development from the earliest 
times to the present day, and to establish a foun- 
dation in the enjoyment and appreciation of good 
music. Special attention is given to the art, struc- 
ture, and esthetic principles of the best music of 
all times, to the placement of music in art and 
life during each period and the influences of the 
period upon the composers and their music. The 
text is supplemented by concerts of recorded mu- 
sic and lectures. Two hours per week. Two semes- 
ter hours credit each semester. 

131. HARMONY 

Scales, intervals, four-part exercises with prin- 
cipal and secondary triads and their inversions, 
dominant seventh chords, melodies and figured 
basses. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

132. HARMONY 

Modulations to closely related keys, dominant 
ninths, secondary seventh chords. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 
141. THEORY OF MUSIC 

A course designed and offered for the develop- 
ment of the general musical ability of college stu- 



68 LEECOLLEGE 

dents. Principles of music and conducting, as well 
as sight singing and melodic dictation, are in- 
cluded in this course. Three hours per week. Two 
semester hours credit. 
142. THEORY OF MUSIC 

Continuation of Music 141. Three hours per week. 
Two semester hours credit. 

ORIENTATION 

101. GENERAL ORIENTATION 

A course designed to acquaint the student with 
college life and its program. One hour per week. 
One semester hour credit. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

101. INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

It is the aim of this course to acquaint the student 
with the history, development, aims, objectives, 
and principles of physical education, showing the 
way in which physical education is organized on 
various other fields of study. Two hours per week. 
Two semester hours credit. 

102. COMMUNITY HYGIENE 

This course contains material of health as related 
to the whole community, such as sanitation of the 
water supply, occupational health hazards, food 
control, health agencies and their work, and a 
study of most major communicable and infectious 
diseases. Two hours per week. Two semester 
hours credit. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

211. GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

A study of the fundamental principles of human 
activities, including the aims and methods of psy- 
chology, the relative contributions of heredity and 
environment to intelligence and individual differ- 
ences, the origin and development of the individu- 
al; his emotions, motives, personality; the study 
of learning, memory, observation and thinking. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 69 

Three hours per week. Three semester hours 
credit. 
212. PSYCHOLOGY OF PERSONAL ADJUSTMENT 
A continuation of Psychology 211 and an intro- 
duction to mental hygiene. Principles and tech- 
niques of mental health are studied with the ob- 
jective of teaching the student how to apply the 
principles of mental health in attaining emotional 
health and stability. Emphasis is placed on the 
necessity of developing a philosophy of life and 
a mental attitude that foster emotional adjust- 
ment. Minor and major emotional disorders are 
examined to facilitate the understanding of the 
varied implications of emotional problems as far 
as mental health is concerned. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 

RELIGION 

111. BIBLE INTRODUCTION 

A study of the development of the Bible, its trans- 
lations and historical background. Particular em- 
phasis will be laid upon the main themes of the 
various books and their spiritual and devotional 
value to our own day. This course deals primarily 
with the Old Testament, with some attention to 
Jewish history in the period between the Testa- 
ments down to the birth of Christ. Three hours 
per week. Three semester hours credit. 

112. BIBLE INTRODUCTION 

A continuation of Religion 111 with primary em- 
phasis on the New Testament. Considerable at- 
tention is given to the Gospels and the life and 
teachings of Jesus and to the early developmental 
period of the Christian Church. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 
121. BASIC DOCTRINES OF THE CHRISTIAN 
FAITH 

A systematic study and analysis of the basic con- 
cepts of the Christian religion. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 



70 LEECOLLEGE 

122. BASIC DOCTRINES OF THE CHRISTIAN 
FAITH 

A continuation of 121. Three hours per week. 
Three semester hours credit. 

142. HISTORY OF CHRISTIANITY 

A survey of the history of the Christian Church 
from the Apostolic Age to the present. Particular 
attention is given to the lives and theological 
thinking of the great Christian leaders of the 
areas. Three hours per week. Three semester 
hours credit. 

221. THE NEW TESTAMENT EPISTLES 

An analytic and theological study of the new 
Testament Epistles, with special attention given 
to the Epistles of St. Paul. Three hours per week. 
Three semester hours credit. 

222. THE NEW TESTAMENT EPISTLES 

A continuation of Religion 221. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 

231. SERMON PREPARATION AND DELIVERY 

A practical course in homiletics, with actual prac- 
tice in the preparation, arrangements, and deliv- 
ery of sermons. Considerable attention is given 
to style of the great preachers of various ages and 
broad reading in the homiletical fields is expected 
of each student. Two hours per week. Two semes- 
ter hours credit. 

232. SERMON PREPARATION AND DELIVERY 

A continuation of 231. Two hours per week. Two 
semester hours credit. 

241. CHURCH AND GROUP LEADERSHIP 

The various problems of the pastor in the leader- 
ship of his congregation are discussed. The social 
and community responsibilities of the minister and 
how he may meet these responsibilities, as well as 
responsibilities to his church, are part of the con- 
tent of course material. The leadership of formal 
and informal groups, principles of parliamentary 
law, committee work, etc. Two hours per week. 
Two semester hours credit. 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 71 

242. CHURCH AND GROUP LEADERSHIP 

A continuation of 241. Two hours per week. Two 
semester hours credit. 

SCIENCES 

Astronomy 

131. GENERAL ASTRONOMY 

A study of the moon, sun, planets, comets, stars, 
the Milky Way, and galaxies. Also, much attention 
will be devoted to navigation and climate. Obser- 
vation of the heavenly bodies will be made. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

132. GENERAL ASTRONOMY 

A continuation of Astronomy 132. Three hours 
per week. Three semester hours credit. 

Biology 

111. GENERAL BIOLOGY 

A study of plants and animals. Emphasis on mor- 
phology, physiology, and classification of plants 
and animals. Laboratory practice four hours a 
week, lecture two hours. Four semester hours 
credit. 

112. GENERAL BIOLOGY 

A continued study of plants and animals. Special 
attention to organs, systems, and their functions. 
A study of biological principles and theories in- 
cluded. Laboratory practice four hours a week, 
lecture two hours. Four semester hours credit. 

Chemistry 

111, 112. GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

Two lectures, one recitation, one lab period for 
the entire year. Last third of year devoted to 
qualitative analysis. Four hours credit each semes- 
ter. 

Physics 

111. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS 

A survey of the field of physics and its relation 
to other fields of knowledge, followed by a study 
of the natural laws involved in physical phenom- 



72 LEE COLLEGE 

ena. Natural laws are fully demonstrated by ex- 
periments and numerous applications are taken 
from everyday experiences. Particular attention is 
given to the fields of mechanics and heat, and 
electricity and magnetism. Two hours lecture, one 
laboratory period. Three semester hours credit. 
112. INTRODUCTORY PHYSICS 

A continuation of introductory physics with a 
further study of the natural laws of the physical 
universe. Special attention is given to fields of 
sound and light. Two hours lecture, one laboratory 
period. Three semester hours credit. 

SOCIOLOGY 

201. MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY 

An introductory study of marriage and early mar- 
ital adjustments, based upon the assumption that 
successful marriage and family life is of signifi- 
cant personal and social value, the achievement 
of which may be aided by study and preparation. 
Family preparation for marriage; marriage and 
early marital adjustment; parenthood and family 
crises and ways of meeting them. Three hours 
per week. Three semester hours credit one semes- 
ter. 

211. GENERAL SOCIOLOGY 

Introduces the student to the sociological concepts, 
including the history and development of culture 
and the organization of modern society. Three 
hours per week. Three semester hours credit. 

212. SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

Deals with personality and society disorganiza- 
tions, including juvenile delinquency, poverty, 
feeble-mindedness, and abnormality. Three hours 
per week. Three semester hours credit. 

SPEECH 

111. FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 

A beginner's course in basic principles of speech 
directed toward the establishment of habits of 
good speech. Attention to the technique of voice 



JUNIOR COLLEGE 73 

production ; coordination of body and mind through 
posture, movement, and gesture; pronunciation 
and articulation. Three hours per week. Three se- 
mester hours credit. 

112. PUBLIC SPEAKING 

A course in platform theory and practice for those 
who wish to develop fundamental skill in direct 
public address. Speech composition is studied and 
various types of short speeches will be prepared 
and delivered. Three hours per week. Three se- 
mester hours credit. 

211. DICTION 

This course embraces a study of word meanings, 
usage, their clear and distinct utterance. It has 
two objectives: To improve articulation and pro- 
nunciation, and to build a larger and more useful 
vocabulary. Two hours per week. Two semester 
hours credit. 

222. INTERPRETATIVE READING 

A study of, and oral interpretation of, various 
types of literature. Emphasis is given to the tech- 
niques of impression and expression. This course 
is designed to develop the student's faculties of 
appreciation and to supplement his study of plat- 
form speaking. Prerequisites: Speech 111-112. 
Three hours per week. Three semester hours 
credit. 

231. DRAMATICS 

This course is planned to meet the needs of the 
amateur producer in school and community. Fun- 
damental principles of acting are included; such 
as training in voice, pantomime, and impersona- 
tions. This course also provides a practical knowl- 
edge of stagecraft, scene-building, scene paint- 
ing, lighting, costuming, and make-up. The course 
is completed with actual rehearsals which give 
practice in both acting and directing. Prerequi- 
sites: Speech 111-112 or consent of instructor. 
Three hours per week. Three semester hours 
credit. 

232. DRAMATICS 

A continuation of Speech 231. Three hours per 
week. Three semester hours credit. 



Division of Religious 
Education 



PURPOSE 

The Division of Religious Education attempts to give 
the student of religion the most wholesome of spiritual 
and intellectual development, to help him construct a 
practical, moral philosophy, to build his faith upon a 
deeper understanding of religious truths, and to install 
within him a greater appreciation of the highest values 
of a life of service to God and man. It purposes to take 
students where they are and help them advance as far 
as possible. 

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who have the basic skills of reading and 
writing are taken where they are and placed in appro- 
priate classes. We expect high school graduates to en- 
roll in the Junior College course in religion. Students 
who are high school graduates, or who are eighteen 
years of age and who have the basic skills of reading 
and writing, will be considered for admission. 

APPLICATION 

Students desiring to make application for admission 
to the religious Education Division of Lee College 
should write to the Registrar requesting an application 
form. 

All application blanks must be on file in the Regis- 
trar's office one month prior to registration day. 

Veterans who have not completed high school must 
be present on date specified in the calendar for General 
Education Development Tests. 

74 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 75 

REGISTRATION 

Each freshman student is assigned a faculty advisor 
with whom he must confer before final registration. 
Upperclassmen are allowed to make their own choice 
of faculty advisor. 

HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULA 

For those students who need and desire work in high 
school, Lee College maintains an accredited high school 
division open to students of religion and to other special 
students. All ministerial students should have, or ac- 
quire, a high school education. 

GRADING SYSTEM 

A (95 to 100) 3 quality points per semester hour 

B (86 to 94) 2 quality points per semester hour 

C (77 to 85) 1 quality point per semester hour 

D (70 to 76) quality point per semester hour 

F (below 70) Failure 

I (Incomplete) Grade withheld because of pro- 
longed illness, or other valid ex- 
cuse. 
WP (Withdrew) Passing or with permission 
WF (Withdrew) Failing or after last date for drop- 
ping course. 

An Incomplete must- be removed within six weeks, 
otherwise it becomes a failure. 



DEPARTMENTAL DIVISION 

With specialization as an aim, Religious Education 
Division is organized into two courses; namely, Mis- 
sions Course and Ministerial Course. Each division, 
with its aims and regulations, is described below. 

MISSIONS COURSE 

The Missions Course is designed to prepare and qual- 
ify the student of missions for the work of a mission- 
ary. 



76 LEECOLLEGE 

Requirements for Admission 

Students must meet the general requirements as set 
forth for all Religious Education students. 

Load Limits a 

The minimum load of semester hours for any student 
in the Missions Division is 12 hours. The maximum load 
is 19 hours. 

Absences 

All students are expected to attend all classes except 
in cases of emergency such as sickness of self or of a 
member of the immediate family. There are no cuts 
that a student may take without risk of serious after 
effects. A student may take without penalty as many 
unexcused cuts for each course as there are semester 
hours credit in the course. Provided there are no ad- 
ditional cuts, excused or unexcused, there will be no 
penalty. However, in case there are additional cuts, ex- 
cused or unexcused, one quality point for each addi- 
tional cut will be deducted from the permanent record. 
For example, a student taking a course carrying three 
semester hours of credit would not be penalized if he 
took three unexcused cuts during the semester; but if 
he had to take other cuts after he had taken three un- 
excused cuts, then each additional cut would result in 
one quality point deduction from the permanent record 
of the student. A shortage of quality points will keep 
an individual from graduating. Each unexcused cut be- 
yond one for each semester hour of credit the course 
carries will result in the loss of one hour of credit per 
cut in the course or courses in which the excessive cuts 
occur. 

Change of Schedule and Dropping Courses 

Students will be assigned to the courses according to 
the curriculum that they choose. As far as possible 
students will be allowed to elect certain courses as elec- 
tives according to personal preference and needs. Once 
a student has registered for a course he will not be 
allowed to drop the course unless permission is first 
granted by the dean, registrar, or faculty advisor. 
There is a day set aside for necessary changes of sched- 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 77 

ule of the students where certain circumstances make 
a change necessary. There will be no charge for changes 
made at this time. Changes made later will necessitate 
the payment of a $1.00 change of schedule fee. Students 
will not be allowed to go to a class for a while and then 
stop attending the class. Each unexcused cut beyond 
the allowable cuts (see Absences) will result in the 
loss of one quality point from the permanent record. 
BE SURE THAT YOU HAVE BEEN CLEARED 
THROUGH THE OFFICE OF THE REGISTRAR BE- 
FORE YOU STOP ATTENDING A COURSE IN 
WHICH YOU ARE REGISTERED. 

General Requirements for Graduation 

No student will be permitted to graduate from the 
Religious Education Division who has not demonstrated 
the ability to write and speak good English. Any stu- 
dent found deficient in the fundamentals of good read- 
ing, writing, spelling, and language usages will be as- 
signed such subjects as the academic administration of 
his division deems necessary and will not be permitted 
to graduate until he has corrected his deficiencies. 

An average of 15 semester hours per semester, or a 
total of 90 hours and 90 quality points during the three- 
year course, is required for graduation. 

The total of 90 semester hours shall consist of 74 
hours of required subjects and 16 hours of electives. 

Diploma 

For 90 semester hours of required and elective work 
satisfactorily completed and 90 quality points, the stu- 
dent is given a diploma showing completion of the Mis- 
sions Course. 

MINISTERIAL COURSE 

The Ministerial Division is designed to prepare the 
ministerial student for a practical, spiritual, and intel- 
ligent ministry. 

Requirements for Admission 

Students must meet the general requirements as set 
forth for all Religious Education students. 



78 LEECOLLEGE 

Load Limits 

The minimum load of semester hours for a student 
in the Ministerial Division is 12 hours ; the maximum 
load is 19 hours. 

General Requirements for Graduation 

No student will be permitted to graduate from the 
Religious Education Division who has not demonstrated 
the ability to write and speak good English. Any stu- 
dent found deficient in the fundamentals of good read- 
ing, writing, spelling, and language usage ivill be as- 
signed such subjects as the academic administration of 
his division deems necessary and will not be permitted 
to graduate until he has corrected his deficiencies. 

Average of 15 semester hours per semester, or a 
total of 90 semester hours during the three-year course 
and a total of 90 quality points, is required for gradu- 
ation. 

The total of 90 semester hours shall consist of 74 
hours of required subjects and 16 hours of electives. 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES 





Missions Course 




FIRST YEAR 




(Required) 


First Semester Second Semester 


Course 


Hours Course Hours 


Grammar I 


3 Grammar I 3 


World Religions 


2 Old Testament Narrative 3 


Old Testament Narrative 3 Gospels and Theory and 


Gospels and Theory and Sight Singing 3 


Sight Singing 


3 Orthography and 


Orthography and 


Spelling 3 


Spelling 


3 




(Electives) 


Modern Cults 


2 Christian Education 3 


Theory 


3 Poetical Books (1 Sem.) 3 


Christian Education 


3 




SECOND YEAR 




(Required) 


First Semester Second Semester 


Course 


Hours Course Hours 


Progressive Missions 


3 Progressive Missions 3 


Church History 


3 Church History 3 


Epistles 


3 Epistles 3 


Christian Education 


3 Christian Education 3 


Grammar II 


3 Grammar II 3 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 



79 



Personal Evangelism 

Speech 

Theory 



First Semester 

Course Hours 

Missionary Methods 2 

Bible Atlas (1 Sem.) 3 

Foreign Language 3 



(Electives) 

3 Speech 
3 Doctrine 
2 Theory 

THIRD YEAR 

(Required) 



Second Semester 



Course 

Missionary Lands 
Christian Evidence 

(1 Sem.) 
Foreign Language 



Hours 
2 

3 
3 



Ministerial Course 
FIRST YEAR 



(Required) 
First Semester 

Course Hours 

Old Testament Narrative 3 
Gospels and Theory and 



Second Semester 

Course Hours 

Old Testament Narrative 3 
Gospels and Theory and 



Sight Singing 


3 


Sight Singing 


3 


Grammar I 


3 


Grammar I 


3 


Orthography and 




Orthography and 




Spelling 


3 


Spelling 


3 


Speech 


3 


Speech 


3 




(Electives) 




Poetical Books (1 Sem.) 3 


Modern Cults 


2 


Christian Education 


3 


Christian Education 


3 


Pentecostal Truths and 


Music 


2 


Practices 


3 








SECOND YEAR 






(Required) 




First Semester 


Second Semester 


Course 


Hours 


Course 


Hours 


Homiletics 


3 


Homiletics 


3 


Epistles 


3 


Epistles 


3 


Doctrine 


3 


Doctrine 


3 


Personal Evangelism 




Parliamentary Law and 


(1 Sem.) 


3 


Church Polity 


3 


Grammar II 


3 


Grammar II 


3 




THIRD YEAR 






(Required) 




First Semester 


Second Semester 


Course 


Hours 


Course 


Hours 


Christian Evidence 




Pastoral Theology 


3 


(1 Sem.) 


3 


Bible Atlas (1 Sem.) 


3 


Church History 


3 


Church History 


3 


Pastoral Theology 


3 


Missions 


3 


Missions 


3 







80 LEECOLLEGE 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES OFFERED IN THE 
DIVISION OF RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 

First Year 
(Freshman) 

GOSPELS— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A study of the 
life and teachings of Christ according to the har- 
mony of the Gospels. 

GRAMMAR I— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A study of the 
basic grammar of the English language with spe- 
cial emphasis on good sentence construction. Re- 
quired of all students who have not completed 
high school except those whose knowledge of 
grammar has prepared them for work in Gram- 
mar II. 

MODERN CULTS— Two hours per week 

Two hours credit second semester. A study of 
modern religious beliefs of America which are 
contrary to orthodox principles of Christianity. 

OLD TESTAMENT NARRATIVE— Five hours per 
week 

Three hours credit each semester. Prerequisite to 
all Old Testament studies. A study of the histori- 
cal narrative of the first seventeen books of the 
Old Testament — Genesis through Esther. 

POETICAL BOOKS Five hours per week 

Three hours credit one semester. A study of Job, 
Psalms, Proverbs, Ecclesiastes, and the Song of 
Solomon. 

WORLD RELIGIONS 

Two hours credit first semester. A study of the 
origin and development of the most outstanding 
religions of the world. Required for missionaries. 

ORTHOGRAPHY AND SPELLING 

A study of the diacritical markings and pronuncia- 
tion as given in self-pronouncing Bibles and the 
dictionary. Emphasis will be placed on word for- 
mation and spelling. Five hours per week both 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 81 

semesters. Three semester hours credit each se- 
mester. 

DEVELOPMENTAL READING 

Two hours credit each semester. A reading course 
designed to meet the needs of any student who is 
deficient in one or more of the reading skills. 

SPEECH — Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A study of the 
fundamentals of public speaking. 

THEORY OF MUSIC 

A study of the fundamental principles of music, 
sight singing, and ear training and conducting. 
Two hours per week recitation, and two hours per 
week in conducting. Three hours credit each se- 
mester. 

MIXED CHORUS 

One hour credit each semester. Training and prac- 
tice in singing and musical performance in groups. 
Admission on approval of the instructor in charge. 

BAND 

One hour credit each semester. Training and prac- 
tice in the techniques of band music. Open to those 
who play band instruments. 

CHRISTIAN EDUCATION— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. First semester 

an introductory study of child behavior. Second 

semester — a study of materials and methods used 
in the Sunday Schools, daily vacation Bible 
schools, etc. 

Second Year 
(Junior) 

DOCTRINE— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A systematic 
analysis of the basic doctrines of the Christian 
religion. 

EPISTLES— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. Complementary 
to Doctrine. An expository analysis of the Pauline 
and General Epistles. 



82 LEECOLLEGE 

GRAMMAR II— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A continuation 
of Grammar I, with a more intensive and thorough 
application of principles of good English. Required 
for all students who have not completed high 
school.' 

HOMILETICS— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A study of the 
science of preaching. Considerable attention is giv- 
en to outline forms of sermons and public address- 
es. The student is required to read widely in the 
sermons and homiletical works of the great 
preachers. 

LIVES OF MISSIONARIES 

Three hours credit each semester. A study of the 
experiences of the world's greatest missionaries. 
Required for missionaries. 

PARLIAMENTARY LAW Five hours per week 

Three hours credit one semester. A study of how 
to formally transact business in assemblies. 

PERSONAL; EVANGELISM— Five hours per week 
Three Hours credit each semester. A study of in- 
dividual methods of approach in gospel work for 
personal workers and missionaries. 

PROGRESSIVE MISSIONS 

Three hours credit each semester. A history of 
Christian missions from the organization of the 
Christian church to the present. It also includes 
history of Church of God missions. 

THE PROPHETS— Five hours per week 

A historical analysis and prophetic evaluation of 
the Hebrew prophets and Revelation. Three hours 
credit one semester. 

SIGHT SINGING 

Three hours credit each semester. Designed for 
those who have had at least one year of theory. 
First semester — sight singing. A course in ear 
training and note reading. A practical course de- 
signed to enable one to sing new songs at sight. 
Second semester — harmony, scales, intervals, 
four-part exercises with principal and secondary 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION 83 

triads and their inversions, dominant seventh 
chord, melodies, and figured basses. 

AUDIO-VISUAL AIDS— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit first semester. Presentation, 
demonstration, and discussion of various types of 
audio-visual devices, with experience in producing 
some practical materials and operation of projec- 
tors. 

DAILY VACATION BIBLE SCHOOL_Five hours per 
week 

Three hours credit second semester. A study of all 
phases of the vacation church school with demon- 
strations, survey of available materials, and pro- 
duction of various handicrafts. 

Third Year 
(Senior) 

BIBLE ATLAS— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit one semester. A study of the 
history and geography of Bible lands. 

CHRISTIAN EVIDENCE— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit per week one semester A study 
of the scientific proof of the divine authority of 
the Christian religion. 

CHURCH HISTORY— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A history of the 
Christian church from the days of the apostles to 
the present. 

MISSIONARY LANDS 

Two hours credit. A study of the lands of the 
world where missionaries have traveled and of 
those where missionaries are greatly needed. 

MISSIONARY METHODS 

Two hours credit. A study of the psychology of 
missionary endeavor, with emphasis on the proper 
manner of approaching the heathen with the gos- 
pel. 

PASTORAL THEOLOGY— Five hours per week 

Three hours credit each semester. A lecture 
course on the minister's problems in social, civic, 
and religious life. 



Academy 



PURPOSE 

The purpose of the academy is twofold. First, it is to 
offer four years of high school training in a Christian 
environment. Boys and girls of this age need sympa- 
thetic teachers who understand them and who know 
how to guide them in making right decisions. Close 
association with students in the College and Division of 
Religious Education serves as an inspiring influence. 
Second, it is to give opportunity to mature students who 
have not had the advantage of a high school education. 
These students appreciate the opportunity of complet- 
ing their high school education where there are others 
of their own age and teachers who understand their 
problems. 

ACCREDITATION 

The work done in the academy is accredited by the 
Tennessee Department of Education, and by the South- 
ern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. All 
credits are transferable. 

ADMISSION 

Students desiring admission should make application 
in advance. An official transcript from the last school 
attended, together with a certificate of honorable dis- 
missal from the school last attended, must be filed in 
the office of the Registrar before application for ad- 
mission can be accepted. This transcript must be sent 
directly from the office of the last school attended. 

Satisfactory completion of standard eighth-grade 
work is required for admission to the lowest class of 
the academy. For entrance to higher classes, classifica- 
tion is as follows. A transcript showing: 

1. A minimum of three unites entitles a pupil to 

84 



ACADEMY 85 

second-year classification. 

2. A minimum of seven units entitles a pupil to third- 
year classification. 

3. A minimum of eleven units entitles a pupil to 
fourth-year classification. 

AMOUNT OF WORK 

Not more than the highest ranking twenty-five per- 
cent of the student body shall carry for credit more 
than four units in any year. This privilege, when grant- 
ed, shall be based on the record made by the pupil 
during his preceding year in the high school. No pupil 
shall carry for credit more than five units in any year. 
No resident student will be allowed to take less than 
four units and physical education, except with special 
permission from the administration. As a rule, sickness 
and work will be the only valid excuses. 

DESCRIPTION AND DEFINITION OF UNITS 

A unit is equivalent to not less than five fifty-five- 
minute recitations a week in each branch of study for a 
year of thirty-six weeks. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR A DIPLOMA 

The following pattern of courses shall be required 
for graduation: 
English 
Mathematics 
American History 
Health Education 
One Major 
Two Minors 
Bible 
Free Electives 

TOTAL 

A major represents a minimum of three units in one 
particular subject matter field. 

A minor represents a minimum of two units in one 
particular subject matter field. 



4 


units 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


3 


units 


4 


units 


1 


unit 


1 


unit 


16 units 



86 LEE COLLEGE 

The required unit in mathematics shall be the unit in 
general mathematics or in the first course in algebra. 

One unit in algebra shall always be regarded as a 
prerequisite to plane geometry. 

To graduate, a pupil shall show a clear record, not 
only in scholarship, but also in attitude and conduct. 

Seniors who fail to have the necessary units for 
graduation will not participate in the graduating ex- 
ercises. 

REPORTS AND GRADES 

Reports are mailed to the parents or guardians of 
the pupils at the end of each nine weeks' period and at 
the close of each semester. 

The system of grading is as follows : 

A 95-100 

B 87-94 

rffi 80-86 

P io & 75-79 

F 74 and below 

WP Withdrew passing or 

with permission 
l:jr>o WF Withdrew failing or 

after last date for 
dropping course 



COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

Art 

A one-unit course open to pupils of any year of high 
school. 

Commercial 

1. BOOKKEEPING. 

A one-unit course open to third- and fourth-year pu- 
pils. 

2. SHORTHAND. 

A two-unit course open to third- and fourth-year 
pupils. 



ACADEMY 87 

3. TYPEWRITING. 

A two-unit course open to third- and fourth-year 
pupils. B 

4. GENERAL BUSINESS. 

A one-unit or half-unit course open to first- and 
second-year students, and to third- and fourth-year 
students, respectively. That is, first-""an^ second- 
year students may take general business for one 
unit of credit, and third- and fourth-year students 
may take the course for one-half unit of credit. 

English 

Four units are required for graduation. Each unit 
includes thorough training in grammar, composition, 
and literature, and shall be so planned and organized 
by the teacher as to meet the needs of her pupils. 

Home Economics 

A three-unit course for girls, the first of which is 
required for graduation. The content of the courses 
shall consist of the following elements: a. food and 
nutrition; b. clothing selection and construction; c. 
home management; d. child care and home nursing; 
e. personal development and group relationship; f. 
practical art. 

The first unit should be taken in the first year, but 
is open to all years. The second unit should be taken 
the second year, but is open to all girls who have com- 
pleted the first year. 

Manual Art 

A two-unit course in woodwork open to any year of 
high school. 

During the first year, students will be introduced to 
the use of hand tools, power tools, and elementary sol- 
dering. During the second year, students become ac- 
quainted with the advanced uses of power tools and are 
introduced to cabinet making. Both courses are valuable 
to prospective missionaries. 

Mathematics 

1. MATHEMATICS (General). 

A unit course open to first-year pupils. This course 



88 LEECOLLEGE 

may be made a prerequisite to algebra. However, 
capable students should be permitted to enter al- 
gebra without general mathematics as a prerequi- 
site. Students who had had a unit in algebra are in- 
eligible to take general mathematics. 

2. ALGEBRA. 

A two-unit course open to first- and second-year 
pupils. The first unit is required, the second is elec- 
tive. 

3. PLANE GEOMETRY. 

A unit course open to third- and fourth-year pupils. 
One unit in algebra is a prerequisite to this course. 

Music 

Courses open to pupils of any year of high school : 

1. Music Theory 2/5 unit 

2. Band 1 unit 

3. Glee Club 1 unit 

Physical Education 

A two-unit course required for graduation. One-half 
unit per year may be earned. The time allotment for 
each year is five fiftyfive-minute periods a week for 
thirty-six weeks. 

Science 

l.GENERAL SCIENCE. 

A unit course open to first-year pupils. 

2. BIOLOGY. 

A unit course open to second-year pupils. 

3. CHEMISTRY. 

A unit course open to third- and fourth-year pupils. 

NOTE : One unit in science is required for gradua- 
tion. 

Social Studies 

1. CIVICS. 

A unit course open to first-year students. 

2. PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY. 

A half-unit course open to second-year pupils. 

3. ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY. 

A half-unit course open to second-year pupils. 



ACADEMY 89 

4. ANCIENT HISTORY. 

A unit course open to second-year pupils. 

5. MODERN HISTORY. 

A unit course open to third-year pupils. 

6. AMERICAN HISTORY. 

A unit course open to fourth-year pupils. Required 
for graduation. 

7. ECONOMICS. 

A half-unit course open to fourth-year pupils. 

8. SOCIOLOGY. 

A half-unit course open to fourth-year pupils. 

9. BIBLE. 

A one-unit course open to any year of high school. 
First semester : A comprehensive survey of the Old 
Testament. (The Bible is the textbook.) 
Second semester: A study of the period between 
the Old and New Testaments, detailed study of the 
life of Christ, history of the early Church, main 
themes of all the New Testament books. 

Spanish 

A two-unit course open to third- and fourth-year 
pupils. 

Speech 

A one-unit course in fundamentals of speech open 
to third- and fourth-year pupils. 



Home Study Department 



This department is designed for those christian 
workers who, for various reasons, cannot leave home 
to attend school. Credit is given on the Religious Edu- 
cation Course as designated, but no resident student 
can do correspondence work. 

GENERAL COURSE 

The course requires little intensive study, but con- 
siderable and broad reading of the Bible for the pur- 
pose of familiarizing the student with its general out- 
line. It covers the entire Bible in a comprehensive and 
synthetic manner. 

The salient features of all books of the Bible are 
brought out in a remarkable way by the author. The 
whole arrangement is so simple that with a compara- 
tively small amount of study the leading outlines and 
spiritual lessons of books, or groups of books, of the 
Bible may be mastered. This will give the student not 
only a more intense desire for knowledge, but also 
prepare him for more advanced study. 

The course consists of twenty lessons, and a final 
examination. When it is satisfactorily completed, the 
student receives a certificate from the Correspondence 
Department, signed by the President and teacher in 
charge. Credit, six hours. Tuition, $12 cash; $15 on 
terms. 



90 



SENIOR CLASS OF 1952 



JUNIOR COLLEGE DIVISION 



Ottis Leslie Adams 
Walter Thomas Anderson 
Joseph Kirton Barrineau 
Evelyn Geriladine Beaver 
Alene Beaver 
Harold Lindbergh Chesser 
"Charlene Ruth Childers 
Orvill K. Childers 
Ana Esther Col lazo 
John R. Eaton 
Oscar W. Franklin 
Dewey H. Garrett, Jr. 
'Edward Glenn Gilbert 
Joseph Earl Hafer 
Lindsay LeVoy Hathcock 
Ruby Myrtle Hurst 
Joel Lester Irvin 
Paul LaVoy Johnson 
Wylie Mason Johnson, Jr. 
Eugene Franklin Keener 



William Tensly Lawton 

John E. Lemons 

Thomas Lawrence Mansfield 

Claude E. McKay 

Herbert L. Midkiff 

Clifford Mullins 

Mabel M. Mullins 

Roy Lee Newman 

Teddy Noss, Jr. 

Evelyn Ruth Passman 

Marshall Richard Poplin 

Gerald Dean Ridgeway 

David Patrick Suleiman 

Jean Louise Suleiman 

Joshua Ervin Thomas 

Wanda June Thomas 

John R. White 

Rosalyn White 

Mary Virginia Whittington 



ACADEMY DIVISION 



Sara Anne Barnes 
Alice Elizabeth Beitler 
Billy Price Bennett 
Betty Joan Blackwood 
Jeanette Lucille Chesser 
Ivan Nathaniel Douglas 
Beverly JoAnn Elliot 
John Gilbert Eubanks 
Helen Claudine Gunter 
Ethel Doreen Hidalgo 
Patrica Ann Hoehn 
Lila Jean Hottman 
Helen Virginia Lyons 



James Fred Majors 
Preston Allen Mann 
Virginia Ruth Mullinax 
Betty Joyce Newman 
Benjamin F. Norris 
John Petrucelli 
Harley H. Smith 
Melvin Bennett Smith 
Robert Eugene Stepp 
Herman Curtis Stokes 
** Janice Ruth Turner 
*Grace Agatha Walker 



RELIGIOUS EDUCATION DIVISION 



Kenneth Brown Arnold 
Elmer E. Bernhisel 
Willie Newt Collier 
LaVern A. Holt 



Jyles Buford Jennings 
** Joseph Leon McNatt 

John Robert Nelson 
*David M. Williams 



*Valedictorian 
*Salutatorian 



REQUEST FOR APPLICATION FORMS 

Inquiries concerning Lee College are cordially invited. 
Those interested in applying for admission should complete 
the form at the bottom of the page and mail it to: 

The Registrar 
Lee College 
Cleveland, Tennessee 

When this request is received in the Registrar's Office, the 
prospective student will be sent forms providing for: 

1. Application for admission 

2. Room reservation 

3. Transcript of credits 

4. Physical examination 

5. Recommendations 



CUT ON THIS LINE 



LEE COLLEGE 
Cleveland, Tennessee 



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